358. Livestock and Field Technician | Rodale Institute | Baylor Lansden | Kutztown, PA

Baylor Lansden, Livestock and Field Technician, from the Rodale Institute, shares his journey. Read the unedited computer generated transcript here.

Welcome to the Green Organic Garden. It is Friday, December 4th, 2020, but it’ll probably be 2021. When you hear this. Cause it’s season three. I have an amazing guest on the line. He’s a rockstar millennial and he’s here from the Rodale Institute.

4m 21s

Jackie

So, Oh my goodness. Baylor welcome to the show Baylor Lansden welcome Baylor.

4m 31s

Baylor Lansden

Thank you. Thank you. Thank you, Jackie.

4m 34s

Jackie

Well, go ahead and tell listeners a little bit about yourself. Are you from Pennsylvania? Is that where you’re at?

4m 40s

Baylor Lansden

I am in Pennsylvania at the, at the minute. Yes, I am originally from Louisiana, but I moved here for the Rodale Institute main campus, which is in Kutztown, Pennsylvania.

4m 54s

Jackie

So how did you get there? How’d you get that job?

4m 58s

Baylor Lansden

I, I started out here as a intern, our like beginning, beginning farmer training program. I was working at an extension sir station in Louisiana after my master’s degree and I loved it. It was like more horticultural style, but I just, it wasn’t where my heart was. So I decided to make a jump and started a former training internship here.

5m 36s

Jackie

And that’s exactly why I love millennials because 28 you already have a master’s and you’re working at Rodale’s.

5m 44s

Baylor Lansden

Yeah, I mean it, I don’t know. It just felt like the best way for me to actually get involved in what I wanted to. I, I thought that I wanted to go more of like the policy route to do with agriculture, but I, I guess I was just like biding my time and going into a lot of debt with a master’s degree to realize that all I wanted to do was be a farmer, which is it all worked out in the end.

6m 16s

Jackie

Cool. I’m always selling my grandkids masters before marriage masters before me. I just really, I just really want my masters. I wanted to get my master’s and work for Rodale, the publishing company in New York. Like I dreamed about working for organic gardening for years.

6m 37s

Baylor Lansden

Oh yeah. That was honestly like part of where I started to. I remember like picking up that magazine when I was a little kid and flipping through it and I don’t know, I didn’t even know what I was doing at the time, but it was just fun. It was just like a little escape for me.

6m 55s

Jackie

So speaking of being a little kid, Baylor, I always start my show asking about your very first gardening experience. So were you a kid who were you with and what were you growing

7m 5s

Baylor Lansden

At one point I was a kid. Yes. And I,

7m 9s

Jackie

You were a kid when you started gardening.

7m 13s

Baylor Lansden

Yeah. Some people would still say I’m a kid, but I, I was a kid when I started gardening because my mother was an avid like herb gardener and it may be a stretch to call her an herbalist, but she was just kind of like a armchair herbalist. She had a huge herb garden and we created all kinds of different concoctions for our own like quote unquote medicine out of them. So I like started helping her with that whenever I was really young, we didn’t really do many vegetables, but it definitely like helped me get my feet wet in the whole gardening experience.

7m 56s

Baylor Lansden

For sure.

7m 58s

Jackie

So what do you grow at Rodale’s?

8m 3s

Baylor Lansden

Well, we have a very diverse campus here. So part of it is like the farmer training program and part of it is research and the, the research side has row crops. So all of your typical corn, soy wheat, et cetera. And then they also have a vegetable systems trial, which has like sweet corn, butternut squash, romaine lettuce. I’m definitely missing something, but yeah, they do like a series of different, special, Oh, green beans.

8m 44s

Baylor Lansden

They do a series of different vegetables just to do like a side-by-side organic versus conventional. And then the ASC program, which is like part of the farmer training program does a wide variety of vegetables for a CSA.

9m 8s

Jackie

What part do you specifically work in?

9m 11s

Baylor Lansden

Well, I started as an ASC intern, which is the farmer training program. Sorry, if that gets kind of confusing, it’s just like the ASC, ASC, agricultural supported communities is the name of our farmer training program. So I started as an intern inside that and I worked in that for a little under two years and I just started my new position as a livestock and field technician. So honestly right now, most of my time is spent with the livestock, which I know that’s not the subject of this podcast.

9m 48s

Jackie

No, I was just gonna say cool. Let’s hear about that.

9m 51s

Baylor Lansden

Yeah. I mean, that’s where I guess I would say the majority of my heart lies. I’ve been working with livestock since I was a kid as well. I just always had an interest in it. I started in FFA young with poultry and swine and that’s exactly what we do here. We have a passionate poultry barn and we also have pastured layers, pastured, meat, birds, and turkeys. So I work with all of that. And then on the technician side for the field, I’m called off just to do field work, like field prepping, planting, et cetera.

10m 33s

Jackie

But I guess we haven’t really talked a lot on my show, at least not recently about the benefits to having livestock, to growing crops and food and to the land. And then I was just like interview number one for season three. That’s going to launch on January 1st is with Daniel Mays. I don’t know if you’ve, I think his name is maze. He just wrote a book called the no till vegetable farmer, the neutral vegetable gardener, the no till organic vegetable anyway. And he talks about him and his wife had been on a farm in Southern Maine for about seven years and they, they just had their second baby.

11m 20s

Jackie

So they just got rid of their livestock looking at his book and then talking like, like, but I haven’t had a guest on, in a while. Talk about what are the benefits to gardening? Like why would you have, I mean, it would also is like, I am so in love with my chickens this year. Like usually my husband takes care of the chickens, but this year it’s kind of fallen on me. And like, I just like even last night just going to get him some fresh straw and like tending them to every day, like that is maybe it’s cause a COVID and I am home and doing that more, just like I am like, I remember last night, I’m like, I can’t believe I am doing this. Like his show.

12m 0s

Jackie

I grew up in New York, like 20 miles outside of New York city. Like even though I’ve lived in Montana, it’s just shown not me to be doing this. And anyway, I’ll be quiet. Tell us about, tell us about that.

12m 14s

Baylor Lansden

Well, I th I’m sure, you know, like just by having chickens and being a gardener, like just small scale, like layer production has such great benefits for your garden because you have like these amazing little compost machines like running around at all times.

12m 32s

Jackie

Well, I do always say we have the chickens for the manure and the eggs are just the bonus.

12m 37s

Baylor Lansden

Yeah. I mean like their, their excrement is just like this amazing amendment that you always have right there. And you, like, if, especially you’re working with a small-scale flock, like you either have them in your compost or you’re taking out the litter and putting it into your compost and also they can take like so much of your waste and convert it into manure. Like, and that’s also their feed. I, I love it. Like, that’s just the way that I worked before I started here for so long, I had my raise vegetables, arrays, special garden beds.

13m 19s

Baylor Lansden

And then I had my little flock of chickens and it was just like, so symbiotic cause anything that I didn’t need from the garden went right into the chickens. And then all the manure went right back into the garden. And then obviously when you scale that up, it keeps going, you know, all of the swine manure that we have go straight into our composting facility and then makes beautiful compost.

13m 46s

Jackie

Well, tell me a little bit about pinks because I don’t know anything about them.

13m 50s

Baylor Lansden

I, I love, I really do. Some people may think that doesn’t make sense because I also eat a lot of pig, but I just, I, I don’t know. I, I, it makes sense to me in my brain, but I just love them because just the same way as chickens, they are like, nature’s great recycler. I mean, I’m not saying that we don’t feed them like typical pool corn and soy. We do give them a balanced ration of grains, but like, they can also take so much of what we don’t want and convert it into nutritious meat for us as well as manure for great compost.

14m 38s

Baylor Lansden

And also just like being around them and their personalities is really fun. It like enriches my life a lot. And I, I don’t know. I’m just really

14m 52s

2

Glad that our ancestors put in such great work to domesticating these animals and breeding them and passing them down to us

15m 0s

Jackie

Are pig smarter than chickens. Cause I got to say my chickens, even though the one thing about them that amazes me. So we had a grizzly bear tear apart, our chicken coop. And until it’s like fixed and we get electric wire up, like it’s probably not going to be until next spring. Now I actually put them in like little cat carriers and they sleep in my bathroom every night and they, they go in there, like the, the mama chicken kind of like there was a little baby that survived the chicken, the grizzly bear attack we had to, I just gotten two babies to replace the last batch of chickens at the grizzly bear got that. We have had chickens for 27 years. And until two years ago, we’ve never had a problem.

15m 41s

Jackie

And now it’s like the fish wildlife and parks keeps saying, we’ll bring you electric fencing. Like, they’re just like, there’s too many chicken people, I guess, up here. And the bears got to taste. I don’t know what’s going on. So anyway, but, but just that she likes to go into that little cage, carried up to the house and the little BB chicken that we had for like a month before we got the mama. She like sits on my shoulder. Like he’ll watch me watch work on my computer. Like he sits in a house, I call him he because I wasn’t sure. And he, he looked like a little Eagle, but it’s actually a female hand, but she has such personality. But meanwhile, they are like, they have like N like my dog is a puppy and she drives me crazy at doing her puppy things, but she’s super smart, but that is the only thing the chickens do is they climb in their cage when it starts getting dark.

16m 31s

2

Yeah. I used to really shy away from this debate of like, who was smarter, but I’m sorry. I just don’t think chickens are very smart. I love them, but I just don’t, I don’t know if I would rank them high on the intelligence scale. I love them though. They’re very endearing and they do great work.

16m 55s

Jackie

Mike, I’m wondering, like we finally like the, the first bear that came in, like literally shoved the reus so hard through a piece of plywood. My husband couldn’t get out now, somehow you finally got it out the other day. And we finally set the roost back up and I’m like, I came in last time. Like, do you think I literally am going to have to put those chickens on that Rouge so they know how to use it because it’s been like four days now and they still haven’t used it. And like, I had to teach them like how to get into the house once we fix the back wall. Cause they’ve been living in the pen most of the summer and we hadn’t really dealt with the chicken house and my husband just had so much to do this year. Like he just couldn’t get to it and, and still hasn’t got to it.

17m 35s

Jackie

I guess we need some supply. I dunno. It’s kind of a money thing he was saying too. So anyway, tell me about pigs are pigs smarter than

17m 45s

2

I think that pigs are like pretty intelligent just because they, I don’t know, they they’re social animals. They they’re social animals, but they also are independently minded. They like, I don’t know if you’ve ever been around a flock of sheep or a herd of cattle, but it’s very hard to move pigs. I shouldn’t say very hard. It’s just not as easy. They don’t really flow. It takes a little extra work and that’s because I believe they have like, they’re they have more of an individual mindset.

18m 28s

2

They

18m 29s

Jackie

Harder to move than sheep or cattle.

18m 32s

2

Yes, yes, yes. Now to be fair, I don’t have a lot of experience with either. I mean, I have worked on dairies, but like just getting cattle into milking is so much easier than like getting pigs from one place to another. The great thing though, is that they are very inspired by their stomachs. So just like, you know, if you have a pig, that’s even a tiny bit hungry, even though if it’s just been fed, it could still be hungry and you want it to go from one place to another food was definitely the way to get it there. But yeah, they, I have this one pig that is incredibly intelligent to me because I have this little latch on her door to open it, to feed her.

19m 20s

2

And it’s a pretty heavy gate that I have to like pull up and out open and she watches me, undo the latch. And then she opens, lifts up the gate, opens it for me. I go in there, put the feed in and then she goes back in and eats and then I closed the gate. So.

19m 38s

Jackie

Wow. That’s cool. Yeah.

19m 42s

2

Yeah. She, she is also, you know, can be incredibly mean and stubborn, but I feel like that’s also part, Oh, she is almost 700 pounds. She, she is a very, very big pain if she wanted to do me and she could do me in,

20m 3s

Jackie

Oh, but now don’t pigs do something to like, if you let, like, do you have them out in pasture land? Like, isn’t there something about like their feed, like turning the soil?

20m 20s

2

Yeah. I think that in a really well-managed system, they can be great impacters but I do want to say though, you have to watch it and you have to be up on your game with managing them because I had a group of pigs out in a pasture for about two weeks. And it’s just a moonscape now, but that can be a good surface to you if that’s what you want. Because now they’ve pretty much like prepared the ground in a way for you to go into, to make gardens, to put new seed down.

21m 2s

2

And that’s what we do a lot here is we let them tear up a place. And then we put seeds down for what we desire in the ground. We did something interesting this past summer where we no till planted corn into a pasture that was mostly Clover. The corn came up and then we ran the pigs through the corn to pigs, ate the corn and then left it in certain portions, like moonscape. And then we tilled Ryan to it for the winter and we’re going to do something with that pasture next season. So they can be if you manage them right.

21m 42s

2

Amazing tools.

21m 44s

Jackie

Wait, I feel like I missed something there. You planted the corn for like corn, for like pig feed. And they just went on, ate it.

21m 56s

2

Yeah. So we, we planted the corn and then we sectioned portions often fence. We let them into the corn and they,

22m 6s

Jackie

She didn’t even have to harvest the corn. Like yeah.

22m 9s

2

Oh no. Yeah. They, they know where it’s at. They do these fun, like different maneuvers to try to get the corn stock down though, like body slam it or to go climb up the stock to get to it. Yeah. And I mean, it’s not like a complete and total feed for them. They, they can’t just eat straight corn, but it does like supplement a huge portion of their feet by doing that. And it’s fun for them. I mean, they, they look great out there. They’re very heavy.

22m 43s

Jackie

Like, do you have like a Rodale pig, Instagram feed? Like they have their own channel.

22m 49s

2

I’m actually thinking about it.

22m 54s

Jackie

That sounds so cool. That’s great. Okay. We probably should get to one of the regular questions. Was there anything else here that we didn’t hit on that I are we at with our questions? Let’s see. Well, tell us about something that grew well this year.

23m 16s

2

Okay. Well, so just like a little snippet into my life is that this, this past summer I was really heavy handed in the CSA program here. So I, you know, did a wide variety of vegetables, but then I also had my little gardening space. So I, I grew some fun things in my little raised beds. One thing I was really proud of this year was I grew a walking stick, kale or Jersey cabbage, which is this variety of kale slash cabbage from the isle of Jersey and great Britain.

24m 2s

2

And it grows really tall. And this one was it. I just measured it before I got on the podcast. It was almost seven feet tall. So that was like an, a win for me. Supposedly they can get even taller though, but I am working on that next year to get even bigger. My purple sweet potatoes did pretty well. I was happy about that. I just had one for lunch. What else did well? Hmm. I think that was

24m 35s

Jackie

The purple sweet potatoes. Any like, because I’m in a really cool climate, would they do better here than the regular sweet potatoes?

24m 44s

2

Unfortunately for a cooler climate, they might even do worse. It’s kind of, it’s kind of pushing them here just because they need a longer season to grow out. So I don’t get as many purples as I do my typical bull regards and Covington’s and Orleans and all those, those orange ones. It’s worth it for me though. It’s fun. And to be honest, I kind of prefer the flavor and the texture. They’re not as sweet. And sometimes I don’t want like a super sugary bomb that I feel like the orange sweet potatoes are.

25m 25s

2

I love the orange sweet potatoes, but sometimes it’s just nice to not have something that’s like super sugary and gushy. You disagree.

25m 40s

Jackie

Well, no, but I was just thinking like, why wouldn’t you just a regular potato then? Like, cause to me, sweet potato, maybe because they’re so hard for us to grow. That, that to me is a lot of the reason why I like those, but I have a sweet tooth.

25m 54s

2

Yeah. I hear you. I just think that I like the, I liked the sweet potato flavor that it gives me it had does have a little bit more nutritional value. Yeah. I don’t know exactly, but I’m, I don’t want to hate on the normal potato, but I think that sweet potatoes probably do have more nutrition. I know they definitely have more vitamin a yeah. And then the purple ones are loaded with the anthocyanins. So that’s all good. Yeah.

26m 26s

Jackie

Nice. Well, it’s all about variety. Well, what’s something you’re excited to do different next year. Do you have something new you want to try?

26m 37s

2

I want to conquer Brussels sprouts. I can not, I can not do it. I’ve been trying for years now and I just, I can’t get it there. I got the furthest I ever had this year, but you know, they’re still out there. We’ve had a series of fros, but I just, I don’t think that they’re gonna make it. They’re not gonna, they’re not gonna bulb up or whatever. They’re not going to make the little heads. So I’ll try again next year.

27m 10s

Jackie

Did you cut the top off?

27m 13s

2

Yes. And I think I might’ve done it a little bit too early and I think I also made the mistake of, I took too many of the side leaves off, like not the buds, but like the actual leaves on the side. I think I took too many of them off because I had pretty heavy cabbage Looper damage. This farm has a lot of the cabbage loopers, and I just was taking them off because they were getting torn up and I wasn’t keeping on top of them with any sprays and yeah, probably a mistake, but try again next year.

27m 52s

Jackie

Well, that might segue right into tell us about something that didn’t go so well. Is that the cabbage Looper problem?

27m 60s

2

Yeah. Yeah. I failed with my rutabagas, my watermelons and my Brussels sprouts. And that is the other thing. The, the watermelons, they didn’t grow well again and I, those are the two things I keep trying it. I haven’t really mastered it. I did get some watermelon, some lovely little yellow fleshed watermelons, but they just, weren’t really sweet and they’re really seedy. So I’m going to try again next year. I’m going to try to amend the soil a little bit more and just keep on top of watering them and keep on top of any possible sprays for fungal infections.

28m 52s

2

Cause that took them down this year. I know that in an organic we’re pretty limited, but I’ll try something.

28m 60s

Jackie

Did, what was I going to say? Just on the tip of my tongue. I’ll think about it. Oh, do you do a soil test? I don’t like, how do you decide what to amend them with?

29m 21s

2

Now we do soil tests for the whole farm and from those tests, we decide what to amend them with. But for my little gardens, I just practice pretty much like you’re lazy. No-till Gardner methods where I just put layers of compost, kind of like Charles sauteing way. And that works fine for me, but maybe I should start giving them a little more effort if I want to get good products out of them. It’s just kind of, you know, it’s my side hobby. So I try not to put too much effort into it, but I’m sure that soil tests would definitely benefit for sure.

30m 3s

Jackie

I’m right in the middle of reading, there’s this woman, Nicole masters who wrote this book called for the love of soil. And she kind of has, like, I just did an interview with her. Was it last spring already? And, and she talks about these five things too, you know, fixing your show or whatever one of them is mindset, but also in the back of her book, she has this thing where you use like a bricks, a refractometer and then she bases a lot of what you do your soil based on your bricks levels, which is really interesting.

30m 41s

2

That is interesting. And I’ve heard a little bit about that and I think that we, as an institution are starting to get into that slowly.

30m 50s

Jackie

I think it has to do with what that Daniel May says about. Cause I think he does it too, is that it’s more like, instead of doing a soil test that tells you your chemistry of your soil, it’s more like telling you your biology of your soil. Like I finally got a soil test last year and the police that we sent it to, we even saw recent the sample back, but whatever lab she’s using, like I still have never gotten, they’ve never told us what our organic matter number was. And so, so we don’t know that our pH I think was like a 7.6 on the first test and an 8.3 on the second test, but we still don’t know what our organic matter was, but we did, I did buy one of the refractometers and we measured.

31m 39s

Jackie

We compared curates and the curate from the store, the bricks level was like a zero and Mike’s level was like a nine, I think part of the cure. It was like, it had been sitting in my refrigerator since June. And this was like in October when we did it or late September or something so that, you know, I could see, but still that was just crazy, like zero.

32m 5s

2

Yeah, that is wild. But that makes, that makes complete sense to me though. Especially with things like carrots, carrots are always the thing it’s like when you get them out of the ground, they’re crazy sweet, like good organic carrot straight from the farm. And they have all of that, like that perfume that care like perfume,

32m 27s

Jackie

We just harvested some of our last curates the other day and the mashed potatoes. We had a Thanksgiving that were like potatoes. We dug up like a couple of days before Thanksgiving and I could not believe the difference in the, it was just so incredible after they’d sat in the ground that little bit of extra and maybe like we’d already had a couple of freezes and just so good. And the curates were like giant. They were like the size of a potato. Oh wow. It was, it was cool. They were volunteers that had come up from the year before. So my husband’s like all into this volunteer thing now. Yeah. He has like a, you know, it could have been a whole bed of curates that had just, he just, he just said so much going on last year.

33m 10s

Jackie

It was crazy. And just couldn’t keep up with everything. Like his whole mini farm. Didn’t quite, I bought 85 potato player, C potatoes or something or 85 pounds. So he had like 500 potato plants. We have like potatoes coming out the kazoo and we just finally donated a bunch to the thrift store, the food pantry, and just, they’ve been like sitting in buckets in my, in my kitchen and on the porch. And he has like, we don’t have a root cellar. So they’re in the pump house. And just trying to figure out what to do with all these potatoes to say nothing of everything else. And just, I actually finally like signed up for, to get some woofers to come out here.

33m 52s

Jackie

And we had all sorts of people that wanted to come, but we don’t have like a separate place for them to stay and with COVID I just, they ended up not coming cause he really needs help. So I’m hoping maybe next year, but anyway, Beeler, this is what we call getting to the Brita thing. So you have a least favorite activity to do in the garden.

34m 17s

2

Hmm. I really do think that it’s weeding. Yeah. I mean, I’m sure that’s what everyone says, but that, yeah, I was just spent so many hours like on my knees, weeding like roots fields. Yeah. Not, not fun for me. I also really don’t like pest management. I know it’s kind of broad, but I, I don’t know why it just annoys me. I’m just like, come on vegetables. Why can’t you just do this by yourself? But that’s I know that’s a lot to ask. It’s just like, Oh, I’ll squish all the cabbage loopers. And then I’ll be like, okay, I’m fine. And then I go out like a week later and there they all are again anyway.

35m 3s

2

Yeah. I don’t do any of that.

35m 7s

Jackie

Heck no. All right. Truth be told I’m not really the gardener, but I don’t think my husband does that either. Like I I’ve never heard of him. There was one year where we like had some squash bugs and I remember we had to get in there and cut the base of the squash plant open and pull some things out. But like, like last year I had a big problem with my keel and one of my guests she’s like, well, have you gotten out there in the morning and flipped a leaf over and looked? And I was like, I don’t think there’s any caterpillars, but I didn’t realize was he goes and waters the mini farm in the morning. And I go out and do my chill at night. And so the next day I got up first thing in the morning and went and looked and sure enough, there’s all those cream, little caterpillars.

35m 51s

Jackie

I just eat the kale anyway with the bites. But what I was thinking is like, if we get to the point where we’re like going to market, I can’t have these bugs on my kale. And they did decimate a lot of my crop. There were quite a few leaves that were even like so far at the end that I couldn’t get to. So I finally splurged and bought the beneficial nematodes, but then I was talking to Lisa Ziegler and she, I don’t know if you know her. She like runs a flower farm in Virginia was like, Jackie, you have to do the roll call. She’s like, forget the nematode. She’s like put row cover on. As soon as you plant the kale and leave it on all year. So that’s what I’m going to try next year.

36m 32s

2

Yeah, we do that on our, you know, CSA production. We do a lot of row cover. It definitely helps it’s I, I was thinking of gardening, but if we were going to say farm task, what’s your least favorite. I would raise up two hands and say row cover, but it definitely does help.

36m 53s

Jackie

What’s a challenge with row cover on a farm.

36m 56s

2

It’s just, you know, working with the length of beds that we have and keeping it down in the spring when like our farm is a wind tunnel and the wind just like howling through here, keeping, keeping all the road cover down.

37m 17s

Jackie

Do you use sandbags for that? Or what do you use to keep it down to tighten down the stakes or

37m 22s

2

We use steaks and sandbags. The sandbags definitely help. We added that in this year. We were just using steaks a year before. So the sandbags are, are great. Yeah. I think I also don’t like how it hides the crop from you. I know that’s kind of nitpicky, but it’s just nice to see them day by day. It is however nice to come out. Like, you know, after you haven’t seen him for three weeks and you’ve had like a fair amount of rain and great temperatures and then you take up the row cover and you’re like, Whoa, what happened to you? You’re cute. So that is fun.

38m 2s

2

Rolling it up in the winter can be a challenge. Also if you leave it on too long, it can definitely help with, or like help fungal pressures move along in a bad way. So like for the cauliflower, especially if you have the head coming close to the row cover, it can definitely help fungal pressures like grow on the head.

38m 38s

Jackie

The only reason I know about the sandbags actually I was thinking was when I was going to order tarps for our mini farm last year, they all, by the website, the farmer’s friends was like, you’re going to want these sandbags to go with the tarps. And then I think Mandy girth talked about that.

38m 56s

Baylor Lansden

They’re definitely a help. I would also say, you know, even just for the first month of your breath, especially brass, cause life it’s really beneficial. But then after that, a lot of times we rely on either hygienic or interest for our plants to get them through the rest of the season. And we take the row cover off just for ease of harvest.

39m 24s

3

Okay.

39m 27s

Jackie

And those are like some kind of spray or something.

39m 30s

Baylor Lansden

Yes. Yeah. Yeah. They’re both sprays interest. We use specifically. We’re not specifically, but we use it for our flea beetle pressures, which we have quite a bit of. And the PI Ganek, we use more for caterpillars and all of the like larval pressures. We also use BT bacillus thuringiensis for Caterpillar specifically.

40m 11s

Jackie

So what’s the best Garney advice you’ve ever received. Baylor,

40m 18s

Baylor Lansden

I think for my own like personal gardening, I think the best advice was like put in a lot of work in the beginning to spare work later. And I think that’s just the best thing for me. Cause I, I like to handle things at once. You know, like get an amount of time, put forth a lot of effort and then not have to worry too much about things later. That’s why I like doing the no dig method for my personal garden. Cause you can do a lot of mulching and compost. And then after that, you know, you have to do some seeding, maybe some pest management, a little bit of weeding, but it’s not the intense weeding that I see on the rest of the farm.

41m 12s

3

Cool.

41m 15s

Jackie

What’s your favorite tool if you had to move and could only take one tool with you, what could you not live without?

41m 21s

Baylor Lansden

This is a really simple and not fun answer, but I love just like a small little cerated knife. Like those little bread, Giannis knives that people have. I actually have one of my pocket right now just cause it’s like an all purr, all farm purpose tool. And I have a regular pocket knife that doesn’t have a serrated edge for these little knives with a serrated edge. Like if you just want to, it can cut anything. I think so. Yeah.

41m 50s

Jackie

To look into those, cause I got my husband a Hori Hori knife and I thought he was going to love it. But the big challenge I’m noticing is that he doesn’t usually wear belts, so he doesn’t have any word of the Xi. And so it’s not with them, like it needs to be. So this is something that actually fits in your pocket.

42m 10s

Baylor Lansden

You’re wearing utility pants and they’re like, you know, a partier structure kind of just like those, you know, the hardier cloth, Carhartt pants, something like that. I find that it can’t Pierce it and I just keep them in like the little tiny utility pocket. You can also get like a little tiny sheath for it to put onto your belt as well. But yeah, I don’t know. I, I just really like them. They’re just a little plastic cerated knives, but they go everywhere with me.

42m 44s

Jackie

I might have to look into the pants. I’m buying him. He just wears Levis. Maybe that’s why the Horry Horry is not successful either.

42m 52s

Baylor Lansden

I wish that I could just be like, I used to informants what pants, but I can’t.

43m 3s

Jackie

How about a favorite recipe? What do you like to eat from the norm?

43m 6s

Baylor Lansden

So I am from the South and even though my family doesn’t come from like any great Southern heritage or they’re not like really connected with it, quote unquote, I do really like to just like cook collard greens and ham Hawks. I do it pretty regularly. I grow collard greens for that purpose. And I don’t know, it’s just, that’s my favorite recipe of something that I can just go out and grab a lot of and cook it. And honestly it can, it can work for a lot of greens, turnip, greens, kale.

43m 48s

Baylor Lansden

I make it a lot with cabbage. I just throw a ham hock in it. Obviously we have a lot of pastured pork. I mean, sorry, pastured swine that comes out of the farm. So I can just get one of the Hawks and throw it in with a bunch of greens. And I have like a delicious Hardy nourishing soup.

44m 11s

Jackie

I’m still baffled that you eat the pigs that you raised so much, but

44m 18s

Baylor Lansden

No

44m 20s

Jackie

It’s their own. I haven’t eaten bacon or any of that stuff since I was like 13 and I still love the smell of beacon. I still was like, Ooh, hang over my husband’s Turkey and Thanksgiving. And, but I don’t know why I just can’t bring myself to eat it. But it’s funny that the smell still, yeah,

44m 40s

Baylor Lansden

The smell is pretty intoxicated.

44m 44s

Jackie

And I always told my husband when we first got chickens, I was like, either I’m going to start eating meat or I’m going to quit eating eggs. And then right away, when I found out I was like, we don’t even like these eggs won’t even hatch. We don’t have a rooster. Like they’re going to lay them anyway. So I never quit eating eggs. What’s your favorite internet resource? Where do you find yourself surfing on the web?

45m 7s

Baylor Lansden

Honestly, YouTube. I’m sure that’s a lot of people’s answer, but I really do think it’s an amazing resource. I’m sure like all of the information isn’t vetted or anything and sometimes you wind it. Like you’re clicking through a few videos, but you can find some real gems on that. I learned a lot,

45m 28s

Jackie

A specific gut, anybody that you really like to file. Cause that’s what I find. I get really frustrated, like having to flick through too many YouTube channels and especially like YouTube on the TV, we’re going to do that thing with the alphabet and the arrow keys on my like I’m not on a keyboard that drives me insane.

45m 48s

Baylor Lansden

Yeah. I really love Charles doubting. He’s just such a pleasant person and he has such direct pointed videos. I don’t find that there’s a lot of fluff. He’s just like really gives you the information that you want. And he has such like a beautiful little market garden. So yeah, that would definitely be my go-to and it has been my go-to.

46m 20s

Jackie

Cool. How about a favorite reading material? Do you have a book you can recommend

46m 28s

Baylor Lansden

If anyone was like, if anyone’s ears pricked up. When I was, whenever I was talking about pastured pigs, the book happy pigs tastes better, which I know may be offensive, but it’s a, it’s a really great resource. Let me get the author’s name. The author is Alice Percy. The book was right next to my bed, so I just grabbed it. So for pigs, that would be my take, I mean my pick for that and sorry to be redundant, but for books, Charles doubting has a really nice book on note, no day gardening as well,

47m 16s

Jackie

Not redundant at all. I didn’t know that. I’ll have to look into that.

47m 20s

Baylor Lansden

Yeah. Our bookstore here just started carrying it and I was like, Oh wow. I’m definitely like keeping that on my bedside. Cool.

47m 31s

Jackie

Well, we’re at my final question, which is kind of a doozy Baylor. If there’s one change you’d like to see, to create a greener world, what would it be? For example, is there a charity organization you’re passionate about or project you’d like to see put into action? Like what do you feel is the most crucial issue facing our planet in regards to the environment? Either locally, nationally or on a global?

47m 54s

2

Yeah. I, so I looked at that question. I was like, Oh man, that’s a lot, but I also really love it. And I, I just hope I don’t ramble too much. So please let me know because I have a lot of,

48m 7s

Jackie

Well, no worries. I have an interview starting at noon, so you’ve got like six minutes.

48m 11s

2

Oh, okay. Okay, cool. I love it. So obviously I’m bias. I think that the work we’re doing here at Rodale Institute is really great, especially addressing regenerative agriculture and its possibility to sequester more carbon. I also have just like a desire to see agricultural spaces be more diverse and that definitely pertains to the farmers, but also to just the landscape.

48m 53s

2

And I think that if we address a lot of issues on like food waste and productivity around and consumption and market around like our agricultural systems, we can find space to create more like wood lines and Meadows and healthy pasture, things like that. Instead of just looking at agricultural spaces as lots of row crops. Cause as beautiful as like a really passionate, I mean really patchwork row crop field can be, I feel like it’s more dead in a way then something that’s really diverse and holds a lot of different organisms and space for wildlife and space for just more beauty as well.

49m 50s

2

So yeah, I think that’s my big thing.

49m 54s

Jackie

You know, what’s interesting. I realized this summer is that when people come to visit our place that, so we have 20 acres, but there’s only like, you know, our house and like the mini farm, I guess is only like a 10th of an acre. I was thought it was like a quarter or a third. My friend Patty came up and she’s like, that’s like a 10th of an issue. Like that’s not very big at all. Cause I was asking her like, do you think we could go to market someday? And she’s like not to plant all that. Like she just was like, this all needs to be food and she’s like, you’re not even close. So, but, but there’s the rest of the 20 acres. And what I realized is like, when people come up here, I had some other, like some of the kids I taught and just different families come visit this summer.

50m 36s

Jackie

And I was like, what I need to do is take everybody on this like little nature walk. Cause Mike has built me like these little paths where I can cross country ski and hike and walk through the woods of our property and then, and then come back and at the end be at the garden and then show them the garden. I don’t know if that has anything to do with what anyway. Beeler, thank you so much for sharing with us today.

51m 1s

2

You for giving me the opportunity. I really appreciate it. And thanks for having this podcast.

51m 7s

Jackie

Thanks. And how do listeners connect with you? Like if they wanted to reach out and ask a question, is there anywhere they could find you

51m 16s

2

Oddly for a millennial? What did you call us earlier? Oddly for millennial, I’m not on any social media, but I have an email. So if you ever want to reach out by email, it’s just Baylor, B a Y L O R dot Lanston L a N S D E n@gmail.com. So yeah, that’s pretty much my contact.

51m 46s

Jackie

I just finished one of the best books I’ve read all year. And it was about a girl who didn’t have any social media either. It’s pretty interesting. She’s also a millennial.

51m 57s

2

I never got on the train really. And now I almost think like it’s too late,

52m 5s

Jackie

Not too late, but you’re probably

52m 7s

2

Right. I just feel like I’m so afraid of the learning curve. I’m like, Oh man, I don’t even know.

52m 13s

Jackie

I don’t know. I had to give social media break from about August till the election and then I’ve just got back into it and kind of trying to figure that whole piece out. So even after all this time. Yeah, but it’s definitely not too late. I mean, look at tick-tock it just started and it’s taken off like crazy and like, you know, it’s still has just a tiny audience, but yet it has a huge audience, you know? So no, I don’t think you’re too late, but if you don’t want to. No worries. Cool. Thank you. Bieler you have a wonderful day and thank you so much for all you do and dropping tons of golden seeds. And I know listeners are going to love this and coupon being a rockstar millennial, and I’ll let you know when it’s live.

53m 0s

2

Awesome. Thank you so much for the interview. Have a good day.

53m 4s

Jackie

You too. Bye.