Finding What Works For You | Getting Baked | Garden Author and Medicinal Herb Expert | Barb Webb | Shepherdsville, KY

 

RuralMomBarbWebb

Getting Baked- Everything You Need to Know about Hemp, CBD, and Medicinal Gardening

Getting Baked: Everything You Need to Know about Hemp, CBD, and Medicinal Gardening

Getting Laid- Everything You Need to Know About Raising Chickens, Gardening and Preserving — with Over 100 Recipes!

Getting Laid: Everything You Need to Know About Raising Chickens, Gardening and Preserving — with Over 100 Recipes!

Barb’s website ruralmom.com

Feel free to contact Barb on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, wherever you hang out.

Computer generated transcript:

Speaker 1 (AKA JackieMarie): Hey, green future growers. Welcome to season three. I’m your host, Jackie Marie Beyer. If you’re new to the show, I hope you’ll subscribe on iTunes for free or follow on your favorite podcast app. And let’s get growing! 

Wanna donate to the show! You can “buy me a cup of coffee” where your donation goes directly to support the GREEN Organic Garden Podcast to help pay for things like hosting the mp3 files or maintaining the website.

It comes in just like $5 increments. It’s like a one-time thing. I think you can subscribe, but if you just want to donate $5, if you want to donate 10, 15, Debbie. Awesome. Buy me a cup of coffee.

Thank you so much for listening. You’re the best, but I did get your cute little book in the mail about getting everything you need to know about hemp CBD and medicinal gardening. Although true. Disclaimer, I haven’t read the whole book or anything near it. I did, I did thumb through it. It’s so packed full of information. It’s amazing. My husband picked up and he’s like, oh my goodness, this is like a, a medical book. This woman has here. Holy information. So

Speaker 2 (1m 38s): I always strive to make every word count. I absolutely hate picking up a book and, you know, getting like three pages worth of information and the rest is all like anecdotal story. So I’m the reverse. No, the pack, the information that I want people to get their money’s here. Yes, I absolutely garden. So my first book prior to this is called getting laid, which is about chickens, gardening and preserves.

Speaker 1 (2m 7s): Oh, I’m excited to hear about that too. Cause I recently like we’ve had chickens for 20 years, but they’ve kind of always been my husband’s domain and only in the last year really have I, if maybe a little longer, really had anything to do with him, I’ve just fallen in love with the chickens. Although it’s been very heartbreaking cause something got my little pet chicken.

Oh, I don’t know what, yeah, but I know, but our other chicken that we have, she’s been letting me like pick her up. And like I had no chickens were soft. Chickens were like going to be poking and hard biting me and like, they’re so sweet. And she just like, lets me pet her sometimes. And we had a grizzly bear come through, so we have to like bring them in every night and they actually sleep in cages in our bathtub.

So my husband gets like all electric fence built and oh wow. And figures that out. Yeah. We have had chickens for 25 years. I mean, we’ve had chickens almost since the beginning. We’ve been married for 27 years now and we’ve had chickens for a long time. Like even before we had running water and, and I always stayed away from them because I, I have a really hard time keeping things in cages and fish and fish tanks and stuff like that.

And it was one of them run free. And like recently I realized like our chicken pen is actually one of the nicest places for chickens to live in like the world. Like they have these keep them that like they don’t pet it. So they have bushes that give them shade in the summer and

Speaker 2 (4m 10s): Other than the predator problem. Right. Which

Speaker 1 (4m 15s): We did have a big problem. Once when I convinced my husband to let them out, not into the garden, but into the forest. And our neighbor dogs were able to break into that gate and wiped out a couple of batches a couple of times that way. But then he fixed that gate and patched it back up. And then in the last two years, there’s just putting huge issue with the grizzly bears in our neighborhood. And so now the fish, wildlife and parks people are like, you have to put electric fence up, you have to put electric fence up.

And the first time they posted that really, oh, we don’t need electric fence. We’ve lived here for 20 years and never had a problem and always had the chickens. And they came through and got one batch and we had a chicken survive it. And she laid a, or she had, we had just had chickens lay eggs. And they were the first time we had chicken, Bibi’s like actually grow up from chickens. And one of the BB survived the attack like after 30 days, all of a sudden this chicken Cubs out of the woods, out of somewhere, I don’t know where it was.

And so we had that chicken for like, I don’t know how long. And I finally get her a rooster. And two days later here comes a grizzly bear back and then, and got both of them. And then I got three BB chicks last summer. So July, I don’t know when, but one chick didn’t make it through the night. We had two. And then two days later here comes the grizzly bear and rips the entire back wall off of the chicken pen.

Their nests are, the wall is gone. Then he came back to the and then we started bringing them up to the housing, keeping in the bathroom. And then he came back from tour through our orchard, destroyed like ripped branches. Again, trees destroyed the fence. And so now Mike is like, it’s just getting to the point where he can dig into the ground. The frost has gone, that he can put some new poles in, fix the fence, get that back.

But he has so much, it’s like, you know, he’s trying to put up a new hoophouse and like cut down forest land to make room for a new hoophouse this year. And you know, we’re almost like usually he plant starts planning April 7th to the 14th. It has just been, and he’s got to deal with the chicken pen. So anyway, long story

Speaker 2 (6m 50s): Short. Oh my goodness. Well

Speaker 1 (6m 54s): Mike thinks it’s because so many people, we have so many people moving into in Northwest Montana and we’ve seen huge growth in last year with the pandemic. It’s insane. But even, or we were seeing just new people kind of moving in and he thinks it’s people having more free roaming chickens. And the bears just got the taste for the chickens. And now it’s like, you see on Facebook, it’s like, oh, we had the bear on this Kirk and it’s headed your way.

And pupil have posted. And my grandson got a picture of it on his go cam. My neighbor’s daughter got a picture of it. It’s a huge bear. And it’s just, it’s weird. You know, you see this giant bear. My mom’s like, I can’t believe you go. And I just want to see the bear. And I hike up in the woods and I usually see cows. I never see a bear. I carry my bear spray, but I’m much more likely to encounter a field of CA cause it’s free ranger, Montana.

So people will put their cows up there in the summertime. I have to say, I usually don’t go hike on that road. Like now in the spring, till the road, the road’s closed until June 15th and they usually don’t go hike up there. But I have this dog. I did go up there the other day. I’m a little more nervous because they’re just coming out of their dens. They can’t get a pie cause there’s still too much snow than I am during the summer months. Usually I’m teaching full-time man.

I can’t get up there right now anyway, but I’m not teaching. I’m working from home this year. Anyway, Barb. I don’t know why I’m going into all this because you said you wrote a book about chickens.

Speaker 2 (8m 40s): Yeah, no, I appreciate it. It’s great. Anyway,

Speaker 1 (8m 43s): Let’s introduce you and talk about you and Getting Baked and everything you need to know about hemp CBD and medicinal gardening. Maybe you can help me with my Rosemary and other things and, and I’m sure you’ll have tons of golden seeds for listeners. I will try. I do always tell everybody at the beginning of the interview, it’s super easy to edit. So if you need to let your dog out or get a drink or anything, like don’t hesitate to put me on hold.

Do you have any questions for me?

Speaker 2 (9m 19s): I’m sorry. You cut out for a second. So I, part of that

Speaker 1 (9m 23s): Hope I didn’t just ruin my mic. I kind of to go. I’ve been having a problem with Mike this morning. I

Speaker 2 (9m 32s): Can hear you now. Just here.

Speaker 1 (9m 35s): Okay. I’ll keep my hands off on my mic. I said, do you have any questions for me?

Speaker 2 (9m 42s): Well, I’ve gotten to know a bit about you now, so that’s really awesome. I was going to ask you where you were and you told me, tell me a little bit about the podcast though. Cause I don’t know as much. I know you have a degree in organic gardener podcast, which seems pretty self-explanatory but still what’s, what’s your goal? What are you hoping to talk to me about that I’m able

Speaker 1 (10m 6s): To help the reader. I was the Organic Gardener Podcasts for five years and last December, which was great because I interviewed Jeff . I don’t know if you know him. He wrote that teaming with microbes and teaming with nutrients and teaming with what’s the other one. I don’t know the teaming with series. And then he had just written the cannabis, DIY cannabis, but he’s like the, one of the leading soil authorities up in Alaska. I changed it to the green cause I was trying to niche down and my audience is like green future growers who want to see like an environment like we’re interested in the whole world going green and organic.

I mean, my listeners do tell me they want to know how to grow a better tomato, how to be more productive. But also I feel like there’s tons of podcasts out there and I definitely support the green new deal. I argue with my mom all the time, my brother, cause they can’t stand it Alexandria, Keystone Cortez, but I love her. And Jeff goes, he comes on and he’s the first interview after I’ve changed my name. And he’s like, my motto for 2020 is what would Gretta do? You know?

Like he w I just feel like my audience is a little more dedicated to climate change and creating an environmentally sustainable future and just, you know, supporting now I did do a big thing about the $15 minimum wage and green new jobs. And nobody has like taken me up on any of that stuff. So maybe it’s in my imagination. My husband was like, quit talking about politics. He’s like, you’re alienating people just teach people to grow food.

So I don’t know where we’re going, but we both are huge hemp advocates. We used to have a hemp business back in the early nineties. I am super frustrated that I can’t grow my own hemp, my own cannabis. We just legalized cannabis for recreational use in Montana, but they’re working. Our Republican governor and legislature is working on making it so you can’t grow it yourself.

You can’t sell it. You can possess it, but you can’t buy it where you’re going to get it. I don’t know. It’s super expensive to grow hemp here. Like you have to have like a $450 permit, which I’m frustrated because I want to be able to grow my own hemp seeds and hemp oil. Because as I’m a pescatarian who doesn’t really get to eat, a lot of fish, people are always like, you should, you know, eat hemp powder and you should use oil.

And it’s really good for you for hemp. And then we would love to build like a straw bale house and grow fields. I’ve haven’t been having access to him. And then we’re in this huge wagging place where the, you know, plum Kirk left because they cut down most of the logs that were of any value. They didn’t leave because of the environmental, shut them down. They come down, you know, we would like to see paper products and building materials, meet at a Hampton plastics that will biodegrade out of hemp and CBD products out there.

And just, there’s so many things hemp can do, you know? And then there’s the Rick Simpson cannabis oil like that. They say cures cancer, you know, like I’m just really frustrated with the whole hemp cannabis movement. Meanwhile, people gonna have an AK 40 sevens. I don’t know. Anyway, I

Speaker 2 (13m 56s): Am too. And so I wrote a book and I definitely wanted consumers to know what was out there, what was available and, and you know, how they connect us to that at the moment.

Speaker 1 (14m 7s): Yeah. And people should be able to grow as much hemp plants in their backyards as tomato plants. And, you know, it’s like, and then I see people posting in Facebook groups, oh, it’s a gateway drug. You know, what, what can the town pump and show me how many beer and wine coolers are available right next to the juice that the kids can’t buy cigarettes at the counter one. Talk to me about gateway drugs. That’s so much worse for you, but again, here we are 19 minutes in.

I haven’t even introduced you and I’ve been doing all the talking, so I’m going to be quiet. Here we go. That’s a little bit about my audience.

Speaker 2 (14m 52s): Well, we’re in sync. I will not get political. Cause it’s something I don’t do, but I am in sync with your audience and your point of view in terms of greening up the earth and our environment and living in symbiotic kind of lifestyle, sustainable lifestyle, where we’re taking care of the planet, which is a living organism just as well as we are. Yeah.

Speaker 1 (15m 18s): Oh. And then a lot of it started when I interviewed Tara Caton down at the Rodale Institute was talking about how good it is for our soils and as a cover crop. And like that’s where I kind of like started researching and was like, wow, look at all these hemp farms they have in Colorado and Oregon and Washington. And like I had no idea. And then there’s that whole business piece to it. So anyway, let me introduce you. That being said, I do have like a ton of new listeners, so I haven’t really turned anybody off.

Like my audience has grown huge in the last 12 months. There’s according to my stats, about 1200 people listening. Most of the time and most episodes have been getting close to 2000 downloads. So I don’t know that’s where I’m at numbers wise, whatever that means. So it’s a pretty group, big room. So anyway, here we go and welcome all you new listeners because something happened on November 29th, that we did get a bunch of new listeners.

And then I was on this homestead virtual summit recently. It seems like the numbers have been going up since then. And just, you know, I think there’s a big gardening trend in 2020 and 2021. So anyway, here we go. Welcome to the green organic garden. It is Tuesday, April 6th, 2021. And I have an awesome guest from Shepherdsville Kentucky here as Barb webs. Talk to us about her new book, getting baked, everything you need to know about hemp CBD and medicinal gardening, but I will say she has an awesome website that goes deep into all sorts of great things there too.

So welcome to the show, Barb.

Speaker 2 (17m 6s): Thank you, Sarah. It’s an honor to be here and I’m loving our conversation. I think your prompt, you cover stations are the best. So this is, this is fantastic. I’m glad to interact with your audience. And like I said, I think we’re all on the same page. Well, go ahead and

Speaker 1 (17m 21s): Tell us a little bit about your background and I’m shutting my mic off. So I literally have to turn it back on to interrupt.

Speaker 2 (17m 31s): Good. I’m enjoying, enjoying getting to know you a little bit about myself. Well, I, as you said, I have a website it’s called rural mom.com and they’ve operated that for about 12 years now. I am an organic green gardener and I’m very much an environmentally friendly, sustainable living expert. I’ve been in this field for about 20 years. I think you said you’ve, you’ve tweaked chickens for about the same amount of time I did.

And basically I, I came from a city background. So I grew up in Chicago, Illinois. I knew nothing about farming, but I knew a lot about conserving came from a, you know, blue collar family and my parents and my grandparents were all about reusing recycling, reducing waste. So that’s, that’s something I grew up with, which was fantastic. Gave me a great foundation and moved out to the country when I was in my twenties. And I decided to buy a farm, which is kind of hysterical.

That’s what you do, right? I knew nothing but being a researcher by trade, I’ve always been a writer and a researcher. And I worked in the tech fields for many, many years as a technical writer. I learned everything I absolutely could from interviewing people. I’m a journalist by nature. That’s what I went to college for. So very inquisitive and I began to learn so much that people were coming to me and realized that the point where I had a lot of knowledge to share that, that people just didn’t know.

And that’s when I started the website and got into writing mainstream books and articles in this field, I’ve been passionate about HAMP, as you have for many long, long time. It’s an incredible plant. It’s been stigmatized, as you mentioned, which is just crazy. And I think it’s coming though. I think there’s hope on the horizon. There are states that are beginning to allow home gardeners to grow and develop. Of course, Denver is obviously leading the way in this entire revolution that we’re seeing.

But I also realized, especially when CBD came onto the market as an early adopter of that particular medicine, medicinal, you know, natural medicinal, I saw so much confusion and nobody really knows what they’re doing. So I saw a need to share again, that experience and it became this, this book.

Speaker 1 (20m 7s): Why don’t you go into some of that? Because it, it like, that’s what drives me. The craziest is like the lack of information. And meanwhile, by having it be prohibited, we just push all that information underground and not getting it out there. And that’s what creates a lot of the dangers and people doing things they shouldn’t be doing with it. So, you know, you’ve had this amazing documented journey wanting to go in there.

And maybe, I dunno, like, are there myths and, and, and things you can tell us that are true about it and not true.

Speaker 2 (20m 46s): Oh, absolutely. There’s an entire chapter on that. I really dug in deep. And as we talked about in the beginning conversation, I tries to be nuts when people don’t. So I’m probably overkill on research. I talked to many people, there’s, I’ve cited a lot of people. I’ve done a lot of interviews with experts in the field and it’s all in this book, but I think the main myth, as you mentioned earlier, that people can’t get over. And it’s just because it was stigmatized in culture.

What back in the twenties, thirties, that cannabis as a plant, as a whole, which would include what we politely refer to as hemp, right? Because hemp is a low THC plant C being what makes you euphoric cannabis as a whole, including that strain has just been demonized. And it was classed as a drug in, in league with heroin, which is just insane. No one’s ever died from cannabis directly.

It’s very bizarre. So it actually has come down now in terms of what schedule drug it is, it’s no longer on the same level as heroin, which is progress. And you’re seeing a lot of state states come forward and, you know, changing it to recreational use, of course, with still some pretty stringent parameters. Although other states are opening up in Canada, of course has an entirely different take than the U S so there’s hope on the horizon.

I think there’s enough of us in the grassroots movement. I think there’s enough people seeing the true value of this, that it’s not just about the Foria, it’s not like picking up a bear, as you said, you know, but even a glass wine has medicinal properties, right? So there’s, if you can relate it, you know, maybe you get you for it from a few glasses of wine, but it’s proven for women over 50 drinking, two glasses of wine or two to three glasses of wine a week is actually super heart-healthy.

So there are medicinal qualities to some of these things that we stigmatize and hemp pep is, you know, to be the sort of red headed stepchild, right. Of the cannabis industry that sort of just got abused and neglected, and it can do so many powerful things. You know, there’s about 20 to 30,000 uses for hemp, as you mentioned, some of them, and that’s something we really need to look at them. And as we look at different compounds within the cannabis plant, like CBD, which has a dramatic anti-inflammatory property, as well as some other really interesting and neat things like sleep inducing and, you know, pain, reducing and people, the anti-inflammatory property and CBD alone as it’s been tested in Canada is 30 times more powerful than an aspirin.

So why are we not looking to these things? And we have to get past this whole myth that cannabis has been demonized. And that was primarily because of the drug industry that actually took this plant that had strong medicinal properties and people were benefiting from and say, no, no, no, no, no. We’ve got to create synthetics. We need something we can make money from. We need something that we can control. We don’t want people growing this in their backyard and getting their own pain cures.

Correct. And that’s that

Speaker 1 (24m 25s): By being underground and pushing people into closets and growing their own people ended up trying to get the most potent thing they could get from the smallest plant because they didn’t want, and that’s where we ended up getting the super over powerfully. I feel like I’ve talked to a lot of women and maybe it’s also because I read that book, the new Chardonnay, have you heard, have you heard of that book that Heather Cavett came out with and women want less powerful?

I, I feel like I’ve talked to a lot of women that talk about like, the stuff that people is growing is so potent and just wipes you out. And, and it’s like, that’s part of where this problem is coming from. Like by pushing it underground and people like trying to get the most potency, that’s where this high powered stuff is coming from. And like, wouldn’t it be nice if, if people could have varieties and like some that’s like good for when you got home from work or, you know, different than, you know, what you, I don’t know, just anyway.

And then also like you’re talking about like, would you be, you know, an aspirin, you know, people don’t think about taking an aspirin and driving down the road, you know, it’s something that’s whereas like taking something that’s more potent than two glasses of wine, you don’t want to drive down the road. And, but meanwhile, because it’s not regulated and people are just doing whatever, you know, there’s no dosage on the side of the thing or the dosages.

It’s very hard to control the dosages and different things. Like, and I’ve still heard about what are you sure about the other day somebody’s getting their whole hemp crop wiped out because the THC level ended up being too high, you know? Cause it’s kind of a hard thing to control when you’re growing a plant. But anyway, you’re going to talk about some of the uses. I don’t know if I threw you off there. Oh no. That’s okay. It’s

Speaker 2 (26m 41s): All good stuff. And it’s all true. We are seeing though, in, in states like Denver, where as you said, a variety of uses. So yes, by driving in underground, we basically demonized it and said, all hemp was good for all cannabis was good for was the euphoric effect. So of course people cultivated the plants to have more THC, more euphoric effect. And that’s what we began to see now have itself was still being used for things like rope and foreign countries have been using it for many years for a variety of things.

But, and not just for the euphoric effect in the United States, we seem to do that.

Speaker 1 (27m 21s): What else? Book? I’m reading the guy from Dr. Bronner’s. Yeah. There’s so many things.

Speaker 2 (27m 34s): So yeah, I, there there’s just so many uses for it. It’s incredible. We could solve the plastic crisis if we just made him plastics. So this is something we have agreed. Yes they do. They do. So this is something we really have to get on board with as, as a planet, as a community across the world. So, you know, there’s okay. You know, it’s, there’s so much to discuss. I, I have a little lost.

Where are we at?

Speaker 1 (28m 7s): I don’t know. I’m looking through your book and starts out with getting well, are you ready to get baked? Medicinal plants are affordable. Assessable effective, empowering medicinal plants are not a cure. If you find a medicinal plant or plant extra, here’s your elements. That’s fantastic. Okay.

Speaker 2 (28m 27s): Yes. So that’s another myth too is so a lot of people are looking towards cannabis, as you said, curing cancer. They’re not cures coming out of the medicinal world, but what they are are a huge support and a huge piece of what you can do to alleviate an ailments. And that’s important. So people with rheumatoid arthritis are benefiting from CBD, like crazy.

It’s, it’s not a cure, but it alleviates their symptoms. People with epilepsy, there is actually a patent and CBD drug, right? That’s not a cure, but it alleviates their symptoms. People are using THC heavy cannabis, you know, and they have cancer, I guess it’s not necessarily curing it, but it’s helping to alleviate their symptoms and helping their body to cure the disease. So there’s the big thing. We have to use these things in synergy with our body.

Our bodies are, so their sup itself is capable of curing us. Our bodies D

Speaker 1 (29m 39s): Is actually posting now that, that Rick’s them saying cannabis oil is proven to kill cancer cells in lab animals and other, which I was shocked to see now how we’re, you know, it’s web MD, but I do go to web MD a lot for just anything. That’s my number one site that I can do whenever I have any questions about, you know, do I have the stomach flu or do I have any kind of like they’re to me?

But anyway, we have all sorts of other things,

Speaker 2 (30m 19s): Human trials. So to say that

Speaker 1 (30m 22s): I love the research because it’s like you have a CBD product, tractor, wellness log, shopping list, cultivating and medicinal garden.

Speaker 2 (30m 36s): Yeah. Oh, there’s a lot of the book. So basically what I wanted to teach people is that not only have been CBD are wonderful medicinal products that can help alleviate and support your health needs, but there’s also just regular herbs that we’re using. You mentioned Rosemary and struggling to grow it. Rosemary is fantastic for many things. It has great medicinal properties. It’s also great. If you grow Rosemary and make a hair rinse out of it, it makes your hair nice and shiny and soft.

So I mean, there’s, there’s so many different things that these herbs do that we’re not utilizing them for. Rosemary is obviously a great culinary tool and it tastes fantastic, but there’s so many things we’re not doing with it from an aroma therapy standpoint, to a, like I said, a medicinal here at T to taking it, you know, for various ailments that we might have, or in support of our immune systems or whatever. You’re looking for a Rosemary as a fantastic digestive aid.

So using it, if you have digestive problems during a tea out of it, it also is an immune booster. It wouldn’t take it in higher doses actually helps our bodies produce a better immune system. So all of these things, again, my main point is they’re not necessarily cures and CBD may wind up being a cure for humans. We just don’t know yet. At this point, what we do know is that it works synergistically with our body.

It has been put on this earth to supplement our body and to help us with the basic needs that we have from immune system to sleep, to headache relief, to skincare, everything on this planet seems to have been designed to work synergistically. We all support each other. So that’s sort of the theme of the book is looking at these basic herbs and these that have been stigmatized and how they can actually work in your life to create a better holistic system for yourself.

Speaker 1 (32m 49s): This page 91 in here that says not just for the bees and butterflies growing envelope, flowers, like you were speaking of immune system booster, chives, lavender mustard, nasturtiums, pansies time and wild rose. Like this book, it talks about alleving sh alleviating stress. Colongeal a lavender mustard, Sage Wildrose lifting your mood, relieving headaches, sleep enhancers, digestive aid, some inflammation reduction, like talk to us about this growing edible flowers in your medicinal garden.

Yeah. So

Speaker 2 (33m 29s): In the same way that we look at herbs and I sort of wild flowers have always been a part of my medicinal garden, as well as some of them come from our herbs like lavender, right? Mustard, flowers, things of that nature. They’re actually coming from herbs, we’re using for other purposes, but the flowers themselves have medicinal properties and are edible. It is really interesting. I think the one that people are most familiar with is Rose Rose water is very popular.

I mean, no. Yeah, it is very popular in the cosmetic industry. You can buy rose water, it’s in the stringent, good for your face. People drink rose water and cook with it. Now it’s actually fairly common in the restaurant industry. So that’s some, but there’s not enough known about it or not. People don’t realize that you can actually grow it, you know, pick the rose hips or the leaves and use them for specific needs. You can drink rose water and it is a great inflammation reduction reduce

Speaker 1 (34m 35s): Certain kind of roses.

Speaker 2 (34m 39s): Yes. So what you want to grow is what’s called a wild rose. And I do talk about that in the book and tell about how to harvest it, how to grow it. But you want to grow wild roses have rose hips, domestic roses are those that are cultivated for your florist, perhaps do not. And so they’re not going to have the same use and there are a variety of different wild roses. But if you look it up online right now, you can find you just type in wild rose seeds or Wildrose plants, and you’ll find them available for sale pretty much any seed company.

If you don’t have them naturally on your property. Now I do have some naturally in our forests, which is kind of cool. And then I’ve actually purchased a few heirlooms rose varieties that I grow out front as part of my landscaping, but then I also use the roses for medicinal purposes. So that’s something I talk about the book too, which is really cool, is you can actually use all of these Herb’s herbs and spices roses, any flower as just part of your, you know, create your entire property into an edible landscape, that it’s not only great for the bees and butterflies and the wildlife in your area, but it’s fantastic for you when used in the right way.

Speaker 1 (36m 5s): You as interesting for like 15 years, I had a bottle of rose water in my purse, and that was like the only perfume I ever wore. And I would spray myself with rosewater like 20 times a day and never knew any of that. And we have wild roses. Like for my wedding, when I got married, it was like the sweetest thing. Like my husband’s friends brought us gifts. So many people that I had never even met Kim nor wedding and brought us gifts.

And this one woman brought me a rose hip necklace that I still, I still have, like in a box, those rose hips, that from that necklace that she made me, that’s still like all open the box and it still smells beautiful, but I had no idea that people drank the water or that I could really make it from my own. Like I just buy a bottle of the, what is it like the extract, the essential meal and mix it with some water.

That’s just what I’ve always done. Right. And refill my water bottle instructions. Or I see that. Yeah. I see that here,

Speaker 2 (37m 28s): Do that yourself. You can make your own rose water. You could make it into an extract that you could use for your perfume. Absolutely. There’s, there’s so many. I also have a recipe in here is my favorite for cardamom and rose mug cake, which I, well, it’s just a great way to use. So again, with, with, I’ve tried to cover absolutely every way to use all of these medicinal garden pieces within your lifestyle.

So I added some recipes, so you’re ingesting it. Obviously it’s just a treat, but it has some great things in it. The, you know, rose obviously does a bunch of different things from infant lectionary reduction to, you know, boosting your immune system and it’s getting it within the concentrated form, but also adding it to your natural way of living. So perhaps use it getting recipes together, a little boost in terms of, of what you’re doing.

I’m also teaching people to do that. And that one in particular, I showing people how you can put CBD in recipes because a lot of people do not like to ingest CBD directly. So I wanted to take that into consideration because if you don’t have an enhancer and a CBD oil, it definitely tastes like you just put a ball full of hemp in your mouth. And so tasty if for a lot of people, it’s not, I can’t say I’m a huge fan either.

Well,

Speaker 1 (39m 10s): So I big complaints in that Chardonnay buck is, is that they came up with like some kind of clear liquid that because it was the teeth that people like this is, it’s really about some chef guy who liked developed a way to get rid of the taste of the hemp and develop this liquid that they’re drinking.

That’s like a clear liquid that doesn’t have the hemp flavor, but man, this book has so much more, I should have looked to. I’m sorry. I should have looked at it a little closer before we got on the call, but because it goes a lot further than hemp. Like I just love all this about growing your medicinal. Cause I always grown herbs mostly just for the culinary purposes.

But a lot of these, you have both in here, like the culinary and the medicinal mixed together. Like I’m reading here, the herbs, the spices, that pair well with chicken and corn and fish and artichokes and the spirit Gus. And what goes with which I just gave my friend Felicia, I grew these peppers that you can make an, it says makes a great paprika and you’ve got your, it goes to artichokes, cauliflowers, silly react, chicken, corn, eggs, fish potatoes, pumpkin squash, sweet potatoes, tomatoes and Turkey parsley, Rosemary saffron, Sage Terragon time tumeric like you just medicinal garden time soup.

What would we use that for? Or let me,

Speaker 2 (41m 3s): You can just say this. Yeah. So you could enjoy it naturally as just a great suit because it is, and it has a lot of great herbs in it and properties, but it’s actually very good if you have a cold, because time is a natural reliever,

Speaker 1 (41m 22s): Oxidants mood boosting scent potential health benefits.

Speaker 2 (41m 28s): Yes. So time is really good for easing suggestion too. It’s it’s, it’s my favorite go-to soup when I’m not feeling well. If in fact I had a lot of it when I had COVID last year and it was, you know, it does work. It’s great. Herbs can really help support our bodies in many ways. And that’s what I wanted to illustrate. Also, the what’s not so clear to most people is okay, Barb, why are you talking about CBD and hemp and medicinal herbs? Like you said, it goes so much deeper than just him.

There’s a connection. And there’s a huge connection. Hemp is basically an herb and a lot of properties. Yeah. A lot of the same properties that you find in hemp, you’re going to find in other herbs, like for example, lavender contains Lena Lowell, which is a terpene that is found at home. And so they compliment each other so well that if you’re using my point of this was if you’re using hemp CBD to alleviate certain things within your body, whether it’s, you know, pain reduction, you want, you want to get some sleep, you want to alleviate insomnia, whatever you’re doing, you can use these complimentary herbs.

And when you do that, the synergy between them is just amazing because they contain some of the similar components. So for example, if you add lavender with your CBD, well, wow, you really got a relaxer there because they both have similar attributes, but yet each one takes it a little bit step further and its own direction. And so when you put the two together, they make an amazing reality relaxer. When you put Camma meal, in addition to your CBD, well, you should sleep like a baby because one of them is a sedative and the other one enhances your deep sleep.

So the combination of those two things just elevates both of the plants to a different level. And so that’s why I paired them because I don’t think most people understand the connection. We’re all sort of looking for one solitary thing that helps, oh, I’m going to go use cannabis to alleviate this, or I’m going to go use CBD to alleviate this. And you’re not looking outside that box of what else is in nature that works synergistically with these things.

So that you’re truly taking it to a different level. And the really searching done

Speaker 1 (44m 9s): Like here, you’ve got that little, little terpene goes with Bazell bee balm, citrus, coriander, lavender, margarine, mint, oregano, rose, and time. And then there’s just pages about which ones go with which, and how to, how to mix them. And then, yeah, there’s, there’s sleeping, which is so important to be able to get a amount of sleep. But also like you’re talking about, you know, like how long have I been looking for an alternative to chicken noodle soup besides one year my husband made me fresh corn soup.

That was when I was really sick. But how often can you get fresh corn soup? You know, Ooh, peaches was CBD and honey ricotta. Doesn’t that sound good? CBD honey Terragon dressing, grilled chicken with fresh CBD marijuana CBD infused garlic, mashed potatoes. Ooh, there’s the cardigan rose CBD mud cake. Wow. Yeah.

Heavy cream and CBD oil

Speaker 2 (45m 24s): Edit all my favorite recipes for sure. There’s many ways to cook with CBD and herbs. And I certainly spent a chapter telling people how to do that different tips. I actually interviewed chefs to what you’ll find in the book to get their tips and their experience. And I interviewed a few chefs that normally work with cannabis and CBD products and their cooking. And then I added in of course my favorite ways now I’m, I’m personally not the biggest fan of cooking with CBD because I’m okay with ingesting it other ways.

So I think that’s just sort of a hassle. It doesn’t really enhance the flavor of the recipe. It doesn’t do much for a recipe, but for some people who are just really sensitive to the taste and it’s a great way to just incorporate it into your lifestyle and get the CBD that you need and the herbs that boost that experience for you. Sorry,

Speaker 0 (46m 23s): I got lost in

Speaker 1 (46m 26s): Looking through, oh my goodness. This book, I got to tell you listeners, there is so much information packed in there. Well, what psych look at the questions really quick. So what did grow well in your garden this year? Barb, I used to ask my very first question is like, what’s your original garden memory? Like who are you with? What did you grow? Like, what’s your very first memory of being in the garden outside of Chicago, which I’m also a city girl.

I grew up 20 minutes from New York. Okay, cool.

Speaker 2 (47m 3s): So my first memories of the garden are actually in Chicago and my mother didn’t grow very many vegetables, but she did grow flowers, but my neighbor was Italian and she was from Italy. And so she had a full Portage garden in her little, you know, when you’ve got a quarter acre in the city, maybe a very small plot, but she, her entire backyard. And I would often stay there after school.

Cause my mother worked downtown and I would help lead in her garden. And that fascinated me and the smells that came from this woman’s house. Let me tell ya she’s Italian. So the ragged, all the garlic, you know, the Rosemary and I was thrilled by this at a very young age to see that type of activity going on within the city. And I think so that’s my first gardening experience.

It’s my first joy. Also, my grandmother lived in Florida, which I was kind of lucky as a kid. I got to vacation down there in the summer and they retired down there and she used a lot of fresh produce. She didn’t necessarily grow up, but she grew really fascinating things like aloe. And my first experience with that is she used it on my son burden. I, I, you know, as eight, nine years old and realize holy cow, like they, this thing from the ground just cooled off my sunburn and made everything so better.

How fascinating is that? And it was to me as a child. And so that’s developed a really, a lifelong interest in moving into this from a very young age. I had some huge influences, my first gardening experience on my own. Like I said, I bought a farm. So that was crazy. And I, I, I know it was that farm that

Speaker 1 (49m 6s): You’re at now in Kentucky. It’s not,

Speaker 2 (49m 10s): I was up in Minnesota. I moved to Minnesota and to Kentucky. So my husband works in the airline industry and we’ve moved around a bit, but he’s from Kentucky. And so we, we landed up here. We, we have a 15 acre farm now, which is just a sustainable farm for us and love it, my first gardening experience.

So I went nuts and planted like two acres. I think it was just in the same or close, got like a hundred chickens. And I knew nothing. And I just researched and read. And I went and talked to my farmer, neighbors who were the best resource for anything. These people had been doing it all their lives.

Speaker 1 (50m 5s): What was having 200 chickens late or a hundred chickens like for laying eggs or, or chickens or both, or

Speaker 2 (50m 13s): I did both. So it was kind of insane. It taught me so much. I was I’m that kind of person I, I dive right in and you know, my biggest concern, keeping them alive because I didn’t want to jeopardize anything. Even with the garden. My biggest concern was how do I keep all of this alive and thriving and, and how do I use it? And I had so much garden excess that I wound up getting pigs to eat. The access is kind of crazy, but in that I learned so much about nature and animals and how everything works and, and nothing, nothing has to be wasted for the chickens.

I w I did, you know, grow them for both meat and eggs. Cause my, my point at that point was I want to become sustainable. I just want to be my own kind of little produce store. Why are we wasting all these miles, bringing everything to these places? I realized like way back then, what was happening in the world and how we just had removed ourselves from this farming culture as a society and not understanding how much we can actually grow ourselves.

Even if you live in an apartment, you don’t have to be importing things from a different country, for example. So that’s sort of what my mindset was. And I had dug right in and I was working 60 hours a week and gardening 60 hours a week. You know, it was crazy. What was the struggle

Speaker 1 (51m 49s): With keeping them alive? Was it predator and you’re feeding them all or, I mean, number one, I knew like how much room did you have a pen? Like I can’t even imagine that. Yeah. So literally, I didn’t know.

Speaker 2 (52m 5s): So that was w like we wanted to keep them alive and healthy and happy, you know? So I was staying up late at night, just burning through books and talking to local farmers. And thank God I had a farmer next door who raised ducks. So they were able to teach me a lot about what kind of space they needed. And I had a huge, huge fence. And because we did have predators. Yes. So I was, you know, another thing and I lost two right on, early on from a predator.

I didn’t realize, you know, that possums and raccoons will attack your chickens. And so I, you know, was able to set up a fence scenario where they could free range without that concern. It was quite a big area, quite a big fenced in area that I had for them in a really nice big house that had builds that they could roost and lay eggs and, and be happy. Of course, a lot of the meat ones, you know, you only keep for about a year max before you’re going to reduce that.

So I did reduce down to just the layers at that point. And you realize that chickens are also great. I imagine you do use them for composting as well. I didn’t know that early on, but I realized they could be great composters of a lot of the herbs. And some of those things were very good for them too. So I learned so much about that through research, through trial and error and managed to keep the majority of them alive. So I’m pretty proud of that over the years I’ve continued to.

And like you mentioned earlier, they’re just great people. Don’t realize how domestic chickens can be, are very friendly, domestic pets, roosters, you know, they, they can go either way, but hands for the most part, love to be loved and love attention and love, great herbs and food and sprouts and everything else that you can pass their way.

Speaker 1 (54m 12s): You know, I can not figure out what these chickens or what this. Now I call her queen Juliet because I never paid so much for chicken. But when I had the little babies, so the little BB was called golden Eagle because when he was, she was born, she had this really golden head and this dark brown body. And she would sit on my shoulder and watch me work, like in the house, down in the garden. If I was reading a book while he was watering or sitting on my computer at my art desk or painting, she like just came with me everywhere.

She was so tiny. It was so cute. And then what happened like just one day I went down there and she just wasn’t there. It was, it was, I was working only on this podcast one night and it got after dark. And I just went down there about a month ago and all of a sudden there’s just Juliet. So now Juliet comes in, but she’s been letting me pet her. And now I need to get Juliette, a friend, but these are the first two chickens after 20 years that I’ve ever like held and petted.

And like, I like going down and cleaning out their cage and giving them fresh. Like I put a layer of newspaper and then they put some straw in there and she just started laying eggs. Again, like she hadn’t laid an egg from like October until I was just only make today. I think we’ve just got about a dozen eggs should last 12 days. She lays an egg every day and I want to get her a friend, but I want to wait until where are you going to give her a way? Or if we can figure out the electric fencing thing, the problem is Mike is trying to figure out, he thinks we need to fence the whole orchard because that bear came in and broke the apple trees too, which is like a hundred feet of fence.

And also that means every gate and there’s four gates. And they have to be like, if the fence is going to be, but I think it really only needs to be turned on at night. It seems like the bear came through five 30 in the morning. The times that it came, I don’t know. So we have to figure those parts out. And then I’ve been like in touch with the grizzly bear program, we did get on a list where they will pay for 50% of, but it’s first come first serve in Montana here.

And then again, it has to be a certain Juul. Like I was going to order. I was like, well, what if we just at least do the chicken coop and the chicken? She has like a 75 foot fence outside the chicken coop. That’s within the 300 foot of garden and orchard

Speaker 3 (57m 2s): Area that

Speaker 1 (57m 4s): Would at least do herb them a lake. How do we keep the, you know, that also keeps the dog in. And then what was his thing about that? And then, oh, the fish, wildlife and parks guy or the grizzly bear guy was like, it has to be 0.7 joules. And the, I found the solar electric fence that would do that 75 feet, but it’s only 0.2, five. So it’s not powerful enough for the beer. So it was just like, I was like, oh, we can afford this and we can get it.

And I’m just going to get it when we got the second stimulus check, I’m like, should I order it? You know, I’d been researching on Amazon. And then the grizzly bear guy sent me a video and I was like, wait, did that say, I go back to order the solar thing, like, oh, that’s only 2.25, it’s gotta be 0.7. So that didn’t work. So now it’s like, oh, but anyway, we talking about the Le oh, well, yeah. I do tell my listeners quite frequently, like the chickens are here for the poop and the eggs are just the cherry on top.

They are first and foremost are feeding our garden bed. Although once you get used to chicken, like it’s been like this crazy thing, like is hard to go back to buying eggs in the store. I feel so guilty whenever I buy those eggs. Because like I was telling you in the pre-chat, our pen is just so nice. It’s got trees, it’s got shade. It’s got these bushes that the chickens don’t eat. Like there were, there was this one part where the chickens, like most when I see people, chicken tractors and I see places on mine, the chickens are in this just pure dirt, which I am realizing she likes to take chicken bass.

Oh, this was the other thing my husband about all winter long. I’m like, you mean to make her place that she can go. She doesn’t want to go out. She

Speaker 0 (58m 60s): Won’t be out in the snow. If I put her out in the snow

Speaker 1 (59m 2s): And I lay the hay down. So she’s not walking on the snow and try to make her place and feeder, she just wants to be in that chicken coop. Both of them want to be in there. I could not get them to go out all winter long, no matter what, even for 10 minutes on bright, sunny days, I’m like you guys go out there and get some fresh air. I would like walk them out for a little bit. They don’t want to have anything to do it. They want be in that chicken coop. And now she’s been coming out and she’s been hanging out a little more just in the last two or three days.

So like I had all these preconceived notions about chickens based on me, but really what they want. And so like, again, I’m saying we have this really, really nice chicken pen. If I can just figure out how to keep that grizzly bear out of there. And then whatever got my little Eagle, which we’re thinking was maybe an owl. Maybe she like, she, little Eagle can get over the fence or she could Juliet. Doesn’t seem to go over the fence.

It’s a six foot Heights deer fence. It keeps, but has never fallen over, but little Eagle would fly over it. And I’m wondering like, was she like mom, mom it’s dark. And all of a sudden he looked up from doing this podcast. I was just trying to finish for these guys. Cause I have to return them within 24 hours. And I was like, oh my gosh, it stark out. And I went down to get the chickens and just, we’ve never seen her again. There were no feathers. There was nothing. So we don’t really need a weasel to get in there.

Did I think maybe she hopped over that fence and owl or a Hawk garter.

Speaker 3 (1h 0m 43s): But anyway, back

Speaker 1 (1h 0m 47s): To the garden question, we should just get to the root of things because you’re probably like I gotta go Jackie. And how long is it gonna ask? Like, do you want that at all least favorite activity to do in the garden? Something you gotta force yourself to do.

Speaker 2 (1h 1m 4s): And Jackie, I’m happy to talk to you as long as you want. I have carved out time for you least favorite thing to do in the garden. I absolutely love to garden. Like I just love to be outside, but I don’t think anybody likes pulling weeds, at least the invasive ones. So I don’t pull a lot of weeds because there are ones I leave up, especially dandelions, things of that nature that are just great for the wildlife and the bees and the butterflies.

And realistically, the only thing that separates a weed from a herb or spice is us. Whether we prefer it or not. So that’s, that’s, I guess that would be my least favorite. But even that I don’t mind. Cause I just, I absolutely love being outside in the garden, connecting with nature, putting my hands in the dirt, you know, getting down into the reality of it, least favorite would be if something fails, that’s really frustrating when I have a big, beautiful, healthy plant.

And you know, maybe I did something stupid or mother nature is just not cooperating.

Speaker 3 (1h 2m 14s): That’s no fun.

Speaker 1 (1h 2m 15s): I just sent an email out to some of my listeners day about how many plants have you already killed this spring? Cause I’ve killed like two trees and several w oh just, and then last night my husband sent me down and I planted our transplanted summer rugala I transplanted his basles. He only had, or not B-cells broccoli. He only had six broccoli. I’m like, why did you send me down there? Because like before he even got out of the house, I’d broken truly leaves off of these babies.

And then why did you send me to go do that by myself? And then I covered them with the row cover and it got down to like 25 degrees. So I’m scared to even go look and see if they meet it. But I’ve been trying to take over more of what’s in this 300 foot of garden around the house this year where he plants a mini farm that is also its own like 250 something feet of fence.

Plus he’s got these. He just has so much. So I’ve been trying to take over more of the garden area. And so this isn’t my area. So this was like, I planted a rugal and lettuce seeds last night and, and what else? And then they transplanted some BB Arula because he, I, I killed two batches, but I had one batch, but he told me this morning, he’s like, look, your snapdragons are doing good. Your mirror golds are doing good. Just some things are always going to die, but it was not easy getting that bed ready and pulling some of those weeds were so tough.

Like the grass. Yeah. Trying to get that out. And what was one of the other things that I was really struggling with? I don’t know but anyway, on the flip side, what’s your favorite activity?

Speaker 2 (1h 4m 12s): Oh, harvest hands down harvest. Wait, what? I can pluck that first. Jerry’s a Vader off the tree, right? Or clip that first thing of Bazell Rosemary, whatever part, just the smell, the scent. A lot of things don’t even make it from my garden sometimes. Cause I’m just out there eating it, BB asparagus in the spring. They never

Speaker 1 (1h 4m 40s): Make it to the house. I don’t even cook them or anything. So good. I see my chives are growing and just things are like, it just seems like in the last week, how far things have come that are down there. Yeah. And there’s nothing like fresh herbs, like even fresh dried herbs, like a month ago I bought, you know, like the plugs that you buy in the produce department. I bought a Rosemary. I couldn’t find a Bazell.

They were all out of, I did finally find, I think a Bazell down in Whitefish, but I bought two Rosemary’s, two sieges, a mint. And the one beasel that made it into four plants, the Bazell all died, but I dried it and having that fresh dried beasel even, and the Rosemary’s died, but having the fresh dried, my husband’s like, why do you have this dead plant kitchen table? And I’m like, I’m like crumbling it into my soup each night, even though it’s still dried.

And it was right there. I finally did pull it off and put it in a jar, but oh, isn’t that flavor? There’s just nothing like fresh dried flavor compared to those spice charged by full of dry. Like that stuff is so old and just has no flavor. And they’re so expensive besides it’s just crazy to me. What people that day for herbs, I’m like, oh my gosh, I haven’t bought in a regular snow or since I’ve lived here, I don’t think I re I usually have enough Bazell that I dry in the fall or I usually have a fresh base on my windows.

So it just, it kind of depends. I don’t know. But yeah, without a doubt and my Sage, I was able to harvest dried out of my garden all winter this year. I love to put fresh siege with butter on ravioli, have to have ravioli in butter and cheese sauce. Anyway, what’s the best gardening advice you’ve ever received.

Speaker 2 (1h 6m 53s): Oh, the best gardening advice I’ve ever received. That’s a good question because I’ve received a lot, especially since I’m a researcher. There’s, there’s so many, I think early on was just, you know, patients and not to be afraid to try again or try a different way because some people do not, and it’s just true. Some people just do not have an act for gardening. And I always tell them, you know, you can still grow stuff.

You, you can, you just have to find out what works for you. I mean, whether it’s all right, so maybe you can’t grow it in the soil, but if you ever tried aquaponics, some of the machines they make are fantastic. You still get fresh herbs, lettuce right on your countertop. And there’s really nothing to it. You pour some water and a cup and make sure it’s got a plant food. And I think anybody can do that. So there’s, it’s, it’s really finding what works for you and not giving up. I think that is the best advice that I’ve ever had because just because they can’t grow something, you know, there may be 10 other ways to grow it that I haven’t looked at.

And that has worked. And also soil health is just a huge, I think we, we talked about that really early in our conversation with the person that you interviewed with microbes, soil health is important in a garden and for the success of your planting. And most people don’t realize that. And so they planted in the ground and then nothing grows or just one thing grows and they think they did something wrong. Well, what they did wrong is they didn’t test the soil and treat the soil for what nutrients it needed prior to putting the plants in the ground.

So that’s, again, if you haven’t had success in your patch of land, go find out what’s in your soil, go find out what’s lacking. You can take and get a free test at any extensions and see, you know, in the county there’s tests you can pay for as well. If you happen to live too far from an extension service, or don’t have that in your area, that’s like hyper important. And if you really think you have crappy soil, like I lived in charge of for awhile and we had clay heavy amount of clay in the soil.

So it was very difficult to grow certain things. One of the first things I did, and this is another tip, there’s just so many tips that are great, you know, go find out what your neighbors are growing successfully and, and ask, you know, what grows well in the soil that you have number one, but then what are they growing successfully that they did something different with, you know, you can make a raised bed, you can planting containers, you can control your soil environment. So even if you have a quote unquote Crowdy soil, you know, there are alternatives that you can use to make that work for you.

So I think really be flexible, be patient and you know, know that there’s more than one way to do something.

Speaker 1 (1h 9m 52s): Oh my gosh, these are all such great tips. And you know, I’m like the perfect example. Like since I started my podcast, I’ve gone from brown thumb to green thumb for sure. But I still struggle. And like, speaking of that one, hemp is really good for building your soil. So another reason we should be growing camp and we should have our big farmers growing hemp in there, you know, as a rotating cover crop, but also like one of the mistakes I always make it.

So maybe there’s a listener out there that does this. Like, I always think like that brown spot look there’s dirt there. We should put the plant biggest like fallacy. Like it’s like, you should be looking where stuff is growing. And I still do that today. Like I’m still like wanting to plant this one area. And my husband’s like, the reason nothing is growing there is because when I built the house before you were here, that was the mill site.

And they’re like still, probably like oil that dripped out of the mill right there. I don’t know what, and he’s like also I hauled in like a ton of gravel, like is a flat spot because that’s where there was a road underneath the mill and quit trying to grow there. You’re never cause I’m like, why don’t you move the chicken house over there? Cause there’s kind of like this old frame from when he had like this greenhouse there, this is the other thing he’s like the reason we’re not using that greenhouse is because it doesn’t get any sun.

And I would have to cook that giant tree that you’re always like, don’t cut that tree down next to it, to grow. Do you want me to cook the tree? And I’m like, no. And he’s like, look, I always pick the worst spots to grow still, but I love the I’m thinking like I’m taking this copywriting course. And I’m thinking, finding what works for you might make a great heading or title for this podcast episode or 10 other ways to grow something like your persistence.

And I was just interviewing somebody the other day, who was like, I’ve been trying to grow watermelon radishes for 10 years now. And finally that they grew well last year. And I’m like, wow, if you’ve been trying to grow radishes for 10 years and no wonder, because I tasted those watermelon radishes at the farmer’s market and I’ve tried to grow them and we haven’t had much luck. And, and so I was like, well, if you’ve been doing it for 10 years and haven’t had much luck, maybe we need to just keep trying and that whole persistence and finding what works for you in your space.

And then in talking to local gardeners, like my husband, I wrote this thing called the organic Oasis guide book. And in there I’m like introverts wanted like, even if you’re shy and you don’t like to talk, don’t worry. Cause gardeners just like you will do a lot of the chalking if you’re just a good listener. So awesome advice. You had just been dropping tons of golden seeds, Barb, and I’m going to try even harder not to interrupt you. Cause I just put a post out somebody listeners yesterday.

I’ll quit interrupting my guests. I’m sorry. I promise. And here I am fucking more than ever anyway, Barb, what’s your favorite tool. If you had to move in, can only take one tool with you. What could you not live with?

Speaker 2 (1h 13m 23s): Oh, good. So perspective as just a simple spade. I think you can do so much with it. You don’t really need all of these other fancy things or maybe a shovel, I guess if I want to do bigger plan. So

Speaker 1 (1h 13m 46s): Herbs got me tips for harvesting herbs that maybe we haven’t heard

Speaker 2 (1h 13m 52s): That you haven’t heard, but I’m sure everything is out there. It’s obviously a resource. A lot of it, each herb is, is different. So that’s a real tough one. I think what’s my best tip is to use them fresh whenever possible, especially those that can be used fresh because you’re going to get the max benefit from the medicinal properties of that plant. Secondly, then look towards freezing it if that’s possible. Because again, you’ll preserve the most nutrients and the best qualities of that plant before you dry it drying is great, but you do lose some properties of the plant.

So that’s probably something that I don’t think a lot of people look at and in that case then my best or tip ever is most people try to plant big patches of herbs because you know, they’re, they’re intense as well, dry it and use it throughout the winter. That’s cool. But my suggestion is to cycle plans. So instead of a, let’s just say instead of a, you know, three square feet of herbs, just plant one and then a few weeks later, plants plant another ones so that you’re continuously harvesting what you need and using it fresh, especially if you are looking towards a medicinal standpoint.

And then of course the last batches, that’s what you’ll freeze or preserve in a different manner. Maybe you alcohol curate or vinegar, curate, or any number of the ways that actually teach you to in the book. And each one has its different attributes and properties and uses. So that’s probably something I don’t hear a lot from anybody in terms of cycling. You’re planting. Everybody seems to want to tell you to put it all on the ground at once. And that’s, to me is sort of a misuse.

If you, especially, if you’ve got a longer growing season. Now, if you have a shorter growing season of Montana, you probably do for certain herbs, but like you said, Sage grows throughout winter. Often there are herbs that will continue. Rosemary will continue to grow through colder conditions. So why not plant smaller matches that have it every month so that you’re continuously harvesting fresh because you’re going to get the best for your body, the best for the planet, the best for that earth, the best growing conditions as it’s not competing with other plants,

Speaker 1 (1h 16m 23s): I was gonna say, cause I did see something somewhere about freezing herbs. Like what do you do? Like do you wrap in shrink wrap or put it in the Ziploc? Cause I did see something the other day about somebody pulling the herbs out of the freezer. And I was like, wow, I never do that. Like how do you put herbs in the freezer? Do you put them in ice cube trees or you put them in a Ziploc or do you have to like keep a stem separate how’s that work?

Speaker 2 (1h 16m 59s): Okay. So yeah, that’s great. They, it works different by urban and I’ll discuss that in the book too. But on a nutshell, my two favorite ways, yes, you can freeze a lot of herbs just hole. And I prefer a vacuum system rather than as a black bag, which is kind of a lot of moisture to get in. If you vacuum seal it, of course, you’re going to just preserve it as max and freeze it. And there are a lot of herbs that take very kindly to that. There are some that don’t for example, Bazell Faisal degrades upon freezing.

As we know if you’ve ever grown Bazell and you haven’t frost, you just lost your plant. It’s a very cold, sensitive plant. It also changes the flavor. So that’s one that I’m not going to freeze, but for others that do very well, Rosemary in particular, just throw it in a vacuum seal bag, you know, on the stem, you don’t have to take it off. You can just stem it, all, throw it in a vacuum seal bag, throw it in the freezer. And when you’re ready to use it, take it out of the freezer, let it get to room temperature, and then, you know, take the leaves off as you normally would to make a tea or cook with it or whatever you happen to be doing ice cube tray method is another one of my favorites.

A lot of herbs take really well to this mint is my absolute favorite for doing the ice cube method because I will then throw them in drinks and the summer. And that’s amazing. Especially mint ice cubes in grapefruit juice is like the bomb. And it’s so good for you and so healthy. So there’s different things you can do with those ice cubes. Otherwise you just pretty much throw the ice cube in a strainer, let all the ice melt and then use the herbs.

Now of course, when you freeze some herbs, the properties will change slightly. So for example, if your ice pew freezing mens, it’s going to get a little bit more soggy. So it’s not going to chop as well if you’re using it in a recipe. So you might want to consider chopping it before you freeze it. So just think about what you’re going to use it for. If you’re going to use it in recipes, then go ahead, chop it, throw it in the ice cube during the ice cube. And you already have your chop meant for your recipe. If you’re just going to use it for tea or to enhance strength than just leave it whole seminal, you know, chop it into smaller pieces of course, to fit into your ice cube container.

But that’s, that’s all you need to do. And so many of the things that, you know, obviously one of the best ways to preserve ginger roots or tumeric tumeric is I can never pronounce it right. Is to freeze it and then just great what you need as you need. It just different things. Many, many herbs and spices take very well to freezing and it just preserves. It’s the second best way to preserve the majority of, of plant compounds and plant matter and everything that is great about that particular plant.

Speaker 1 (1h 20m 4s): So can you take like a piece of ginger, put it in the freezer, take it out great a little bit and put the rest back in the freezer, but that’s exactly what I’m saying. Wow. Oh my gosh. Because I, the, I hate, I always buy rooted ginger and I use it for one meal and then I ended up throwing the rest away or in the compost and I always feel guilty. So don’t, don’t buy any for a long time and I love ginger.

I didn’t know you could do that. That’s awesome. Great tips there.

Speaker 2 (1h 20m 41s): Right. And it will preserve, it will preserve it for a long time. That happens to a lot of people. They don’t realize, of course you convert cellar ginger as well. And if you keep it in a cold dark place, it will last a little bit longer too, but you know, lights and well, I

Speaker 1 (1h 20m 58s): Just keep it in the fridge, but I just don’t use it enough and it ends up going bad. But that freezer tray, and then just like the whole mocktail, I think people are, are really getting into, you know, fancier drinks, flavored drinks, adding fresh herbs, you know, like who is it? Ayana Garten. And most of the McCarthy are just about to come out. I’ve been waiting any day. Now they’re going to do like a webinars on, on like, you know, those kinds of drinks.

And I put a thing out to my listeners. Anybody want to have mock tails and just, I interviewed a woman who sold herbs, grew herbs, had an urban farm and was talking about how she, one of her big markets was bars by men for their drinks was where she, and I just thought that was so fascinating. And just so I think so many of us with the pandemic were drinking more. So we’re looking for fresher, healthier options at night because maybe we’ve consumed more alcohol.

And then I know for me personally, with the shift with daylight savings, staying up later and like we’re not even having dinner till seven o’clock at night, instead of like, I was asleep by seven o’clock a month ago, and now it’s not even getting dark until nine o’clock here already in Montana last night. That’s I didn’t even go down to plant none of that stuff that I planted. I was telling you about at the beginning, the, on, in the, not the bees, all the broccoli in the rugala that was all after seven o’clock last night.

And it was still bright laid out. It was really nice down there and the sun was shining. It’s certainly didn’t feel so late, but yeah, being able to have something that pushup grapefruit and mint, I would never think of putting them

Speaker 2 (1h 22m 57s): Other thing and check out page 180 1. Feel like that. Since you just talked about it, curating artists in cocktails from your herbs. All right. Well, it’s funny.

Speaker 1 (1h 23m 10s): Our next question is what’s your favorite recipe you like to eat or cook from the garden? Or did we kind of just get through, do you have a favorite recipe or did we talk about it already talks about it? I have many, but I will say, oh yeah,

Speaker 2 (1h 23m 25s): I am huge fan of garlic. Like, and Bazell so we make a lot of Italian food pizza. It just, the taste, the flavor, the flavor profiles on those two particular plants are amazing. And of course adapt to Italian food very, very well. So that would be probably those are two herbs. Like I don’t want ever want to live without my, my cooking would suffer. I think I use garlic.

It’s just about everything, but I do have, right.

Speaker 1 (1h 23m 58s): My mom was Italian. I grew up in growing up on the Mediterranean diet and she was, she studied like gourmet magazine and just always was a fantastic cook. Oh, look at this rose pedals and Brandy mint and rum, Terragon and bourbon. Oh, you do have just tons of pairs. Well with, oh, listeners, you’ve got to get this book. What was I going to say?

Yeah, great. Garlic and onions go into everything.

Speaker 2 (1h 24m 35s): They’re both so great for our immune systems too. And I suffered from inflammation. I have Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. So my thyroid has gone autoimmune disease. And anything I can get that has anti-inflammatory properties just helps me function like a normal human being. So garlic is a good friend onions as well. And that helps you with your thyroid.

Well, it helps reduce the inflammation in my body. So my thyroid is, is gone and, and you know, that’s I, so I look for every ounce of support I can get for everything that the thyroid effects from my digestive system to inflammation in my body to serotonin thyroid. It’s amazing what all this little thing in our body regulates and what not having one, obviously I do have to take a synthetic drug to help myself.

Well, that’s why

Speaker 1 (1h 25m 36s): I was like, I, cause I’ve been taking that L thyroxin the Synthroid for years and I’m just like, I’m always asking my doctor. Is there something I can do? So I don’t have to take this Synthroid or at least get on a lower dose because it seems like every time I go back, they want me to, you know, every year I have to go get the thing in every year, they want me to take a higher dose. I’m just like, isn’t there something natural. Isn’t there. Like something I can do to my diet to get off of this. I just hate having to get that stupid, stupid pill every day.

And it could this be. And then I’m curious because my husband is not a fan of garlic and onions. And as someone who grew up putting that in everything I’ve really liked since we’ve been married, I have like reduced, like now I’m almost sensitive to it where like, I can’t eat as much garlic and onions as I used to. And I’m curious like, is that part?

Speaker 2 (1h 26m 34s): I think so. I think there’s some merit.

Speaker 1 (1h 26m 36s): My brother both, I think have to take it to, and they certainly have no lack of garlic in their

Speaker 2 (1h 26m 43s): Lives. So there’s a lot of merit to it. I’ve done a lot of research on that as well, obviously, because it’s a condition that affects me. I’m not an expert, but I do have to take a synthetic. I have for the last 20 years, 19 years, I’ve got it. I developed it during pregnancy, which is common, I guess, and for whatever reason, but it happens. Well,

Speaker 1 (1h 27m 8s): It seems like 90% of America takes it. Like everybody I talked to. So he’s like, yeah, I take that. Yep. Yeah.

Speaker 2 (1h 27m 16s): I know. Well, they studies have shown that fluoride in our water is a partial reason why some people have developed thyroid issues over time. Now mine is an autoimmune disorder, which they think is more hereditary, which several members of my family has other various autoimmune disorders. So that’s probably just luck of the draw. And my thyroid doesn’t work at all. Like it’s gone and it still exists in my body, but it does nothing.

And so I’ve had to take, and I also had a problem early on, as you did where it was just increasing every year. And I was like, what? Now I have found that I’ve been able to reduce it slightly and stay stable by really heavily working on reducing inflammation in my body. And what that does is it just allows everything to work better. So if you’re taking a pill and let’s say you’re consuming a lot of inflammatory foods like sugar, for example, is wildly inflammatory food and you’re taking Synthroid well, the Synthroid then has to combat through that as well as trying to support your thyroid in doing its general function.

So I have found that taking care of different key points within my body, like, you know, using ashwagandha to promote my serotonin developments, using a lot of herbs to reduce inflammation in my body, watching what I eat. And I know I still eat some inflammatory foods that by choice at times I don’t want to completely alter my lifestyle like bread, for example. So, you know, I will occasionally delve into that and I know what I’m doing, but for the most part, if I really work at it, I was able to reduce not only the amount of Synthroid I was taking, but also my cholesterol levels dropped dramatically because I was reducing inflammation in my body and eating better foods and, and taking an approach to help support the Synthroid.

So it worked the best that it possibly could within my body. And that has made a difference in over time. I’ve just stayed stable then with that dose. So I, I think there’s some merit personally, it’s worked for me. There’s not a cure necessarily. I haven’t, I haven’t just keep hearing

Speaker 3 (1h 29m 53s): Over and over

Speaker 1 (1h 29m 54s): My head listeners. So my friend Patty and I have been doing this thing called grow live, and she did a whole workshop on, you know, inviting beneficials and friending, friending the beneficials and, and unfriending the bugs and passed some whatever. But ultimately what she talks about is healthy plants will, you know, bugs and pests. Aren’t going to attack healthy plants and you are going to have some plants that just aren’t as healthy in your garden as you are.

And it sounds exactly like what you’re saying, like the healthier I can rank my body, the more it’s going to be able to build my immune system build, you know, reduce inflammation, like a lot of these things that you’re talking about. And so if I can just be the healthiest I can be, you know, I’ve been striving and I’ve been reading Shaylene Johnson lately. And she talks about, you know, just really at least shoot for 80%. And I do feel like one of the reasons I don’t have diabetes for somebody who is super overweight for, I I’m always, I’m like, how can I be so overweight?

Like for as much as I tried it, like last summer I was walking 75 miles a month, which isn’t that great. I’d like to get up to three miles a day, which would be closer to 90 on an average, but at least like, it was a big improvement like March and April, when the pandemic first hit, I was only getting like, you know, my wild meter, like 30 miles a month. And so to be able to push it up to 75 was a big thing last summer. And most like twice a week, I was walking seven miles with my dogs.

And even though it was slow, it was like, yo, this is better than a lot of people. I feel like I’m fairly healthy, but just not enough. But you’ve given me so many tips here that I feel like I hope I, you know, I feel like there’s probably a lot of listeners that are just getting tons of great information. Because again, like you said, I think a lot of us in this country are struggling, but I am like, I feel badly. We’re almost two hours in this interview.

So you’re probably like,

Speaker 2 (1h 32m 13s): All right, I’m glad

Speaker 1 (1h 32m 15s): Internet resource. Where do you find yourself surfing on the web? I always love to talk to researchers. I was just, you know, when the funny talks about garlic yesterday, I was editing my interview. I did with Jesse Frost from the No Till Growers. And we had quite a conversation about garlic because that is one of their number one sellers and him and his wife built, bought a new farm and they’re moving. And he said, he talks about on the show. One of the biggest things was we’re not moving until the spring with the people who are buying our farm from, let us get the garlic in, in October because he was so worried because they plant like 10,000 garlic plants or something like garlic and carrots are his two biggest sellers.

And like, that was one of their biggest things was how are we going to get this garlic in to the new? But I think the new, the farm that they were going to buy, they left them plant it or they leased the field or something. But anyway, where. Where do you find yourself surfing on the web research? Oh, that was it. Jessie’s a researcher too.

Barb (1h 33m 22s): I, I, yeah, I think some of us are just born that way. I am. I’ve been always so curious about everything and it was what intrigued me about going into journalism. I always wanted to ask the questions. So NCBI, which is the US National Library of Medicine, national institutes of health website is my number one go-to because I absolutely love finding out what’s new in research. What people are doing with different herbs, cannabis, any anything in the medicinal arena.

And it’s, so it’s not just about drugs. There are, there’s a lot of research going on with plants and cannabis in particular. And so NCBI, I think it’s NCBI is the actual they, and you’ll see me cite some of that in my book, actually. So if you look to the very back end notes, you’ll see,

Speaker 1 (1h 34m 25s): Is it this national national center for biotechnology information?

Speaker 2 (1h 34m 31s): No. So it’s the NCBI. And that is the US National Library of Medicine, national institutes of health website in the end notes in the back of the bus. You’ll see me cite them a few times specifically for some research just happens, be one of the best websites if you’re looking for what’s happening in the research world for a particular condition or with a particular herb or with a particular plants.

Yeah. It’s a library of everything. Every paper that’s been written, every experiment that’s going on. So it’s really great. You will go down the rabbit hole very easily if you just search cannabis, for example. And you know, this book took two years to develop. So I did go down a lot of rabbit holes and wound up talking to some of the researchers as well, to get more layman’s terms on some of what was going on.

But I happen to love that. I do love going down the rabbit hole of research. I love exploring and finding out as much as I can about a particular topic. That just happens to be a really hardcore website if you’re looking for scientific information. So it is one of my favorites to head towards when I’m looking for something.

Speaker 1 (1h 36m 12s): I’m just going to say what I, when I am looking. So there’s the US National Library of Medicine,, the national Institute of health, which is www.mlmdnih.gov. And then, then there’s also the NCBI.NLM.NIH.gov  So it must be like part of their website, the national center for biotechnology information is part of the  National Library of Medicine, national Institute.

Yes, I believe so. I guess, but the US National Library of Medicine.

Speaker 2 (1h 37m 1s): So that would be a more, yeah, that would be more broad way to look at it.

Speaker 1 (1h 37m 9s): Awesome. And then how about a book besides your three books, which we’ll get to in a minute.

Speaker 2 (1h 37m 16s): Just say mine. I don’t, I honestly don’t have a go-to book in this arena. I’ve read so many great books and yeah, I that’s really tough. Like I’m not the type of, I can’t even tell you what my favorite song is. Like, I’m not that type of person. I’m sort of eclectic and I love everything and I, I love so many things of equal importance.

One of the books that I think early on, I used what’s the, I’m trying to look up the exact name. It’s a huge book. And it’s like the homestead encyclopedia or something, or is it the The Encyclopedia of Country Living

 I might be it, is it the encyclopedia of country living? I think everybody should own this book, especially if you’re just starting out.

Speaker 1 (1h 38m 20s): It’s cool. I don’t have that one. And I don’t know that one.

Speaker 2 (1h 38m 25s): Then its 50th year. I believe it is an amazing resource. It was for me early on. I would say I don’t go to it now very much, but in the beginning, like if you think my book is chock-full of stuff, that is something that should be on everybody’s shelf, especially if you’re just starting out or maybe even if you’re mad, if you’re an expert already, I don’t know if they’ll gain as much from it, but it’s called The Encyclopedia of Country Living and I believe it’s yeah, I’ve just pulled up the 50th anniversary edition, the original manuals for living off the land and doing it yourself by Carla Emery.

Encyclopedia of Country Living, 50th Anniversary Edition- The Original Manual for Living off the Land & Doing It Yourself

The Encyclopedia of Country Living, 50th Anniversary Edition: The Original Manual for Living off the Land & Doing It Yourself


And it is gold. If you are looking to do anything from raising chickens, pigs, beekeeping, baking, gardening, preserving, like everything is in there, everything that was done in not only. So it’s not only like what was done is it’s really realistically, like if you lived in the pioneer days, absolutely everything you would need to know to live off the land is in the spot.

So there’s things you wouldn’t even think of or necessarily do, but we can do. So it’s really cool. Like you make your own cheese and spinning wool and all kinds of crazy stuff. That’s really cool. And, and we’re moving back to now, you know, how do you, if you want to be completely 100% sustainable, this buck, I’ll tell you how to do it and get you a little acre of land and go start a town. But if you just even, you know, just as a reference for gardening, there’s so much in there that I learned from initially.

So if I have to pick a go-to book, that’s it

Speaker 1 (1h 40m 25s): Awesome. That looks like a good one. All right. We’re going to talk about your website in one second, but I’m going to ask my final question and then we’ll tell us how to, can I call to you and how to get to your awesome website, but Barb, if there’s one change you’d like to see, to create a greener world, what would it be? For example, is there a charity organization, your passionate about or project you’d like to see put into action? Like what do you feel is the most crucial issue? Our planet in regards to the environment, either locally, nationally, or on a global scale?

Ooh,

Speaker 2 (1h 41m 1s): Good question. There’s two, I’m extremely passionate about one is water three because there’s just three that I concentrate on regularly where I donate my money towards water, water conservation. We need to readdress the fishing industry. We need to realize that water has the ability to save our planet. If we are using that resource responsibly and we currently are not.

So that’s a huge area of concern. I think soil conservation comes next again, if there’s huge resource that we are overusing and we need to look at ways to replenish the earth before we are out of earth to farm. So those are the two big ones. And then three, I think we all need to step back and remember that we are creatures of the earth. So I think we’re already on that level together, but I don’t think the planet is there.

We all have to get out and connect with the earth, take time, to appreciate nature and, and become understanding that every single thing we do impacts this living creature, this living planet that we are on the earth is a living organism. We are living organisms and we all work in synergy together. And if we are out of synergy with this, which we are currently, as you said, with the green new deal, you support and other things that are striving towards fixing that because we have become disconnected from our earth and our planet.

And this is why we’re having problems that we need to figure out a way to step back refocus. And remember that we are all, we’re all in this together from the smallest little, you know, aunt to the biggest person on the planet, we’re all in this relationship together. And if we don’t preserve each other, well, we’re gonna have some problems, right? And which we’re seeing. So those are my three things that I’m very passionate about and put my time and energy towards and my dollars as well.

Speaker 1 (1h 43m 30s): Oh, Barb, my sister from another mother, my sister from mother earth. I’ll bet other listeners. I know. I feel like I can just reach out and hug you. I’m so glad we did this interview. You were a friend I am destined to meet someday, I know. And just sending you love what an eloquent answer, just so perfect!

Tell listeners about the most awesome rural mom blog. Minimally.

Speaker 2 (1h 43m 59s): I will. And I want to say just as well. I’m so glad that we connected and please do stay in touch cause I love to find people who are just as passionate together, we could do so much. So we need to collaborate on other stuff down the road in our own little, yeah,

Speaker 1 (1h 44m 16s): Maybe we could do a book together. Maybe I can write a children’s book about you!

RuralMom.comBanner


Speaker 2 (1h 44m 30s): My website is ruralmom.com. It’s RURALmom.com. And on there you’ll find me talking about a number of different things. I work in many arenas, but for the most part it’s it’s about gardening things we can do to be more sustainable, you know, gift ideas. A lot of things, my goal with that website was to enhance people’s lives in terms of finding quality things and quality activities that could help people who are living out in the country and suburban areas.

It’s applicable to people living in cities too. I do talk a lot about container gardening and even raising chickens on, you know, balconies kind of things. So I try to adapt to everybody. Who’s kind of out there with me, but for the most part, I’ve found that people who are interested in homesteading, I have a big crowd over 40. I think that’s I’m 50. So that makes sense. I guess I talk on that level. So of where I’m at in life. And I think a lot of us are we’re, we’re kind of done raising children and what’s next.

And how can we now address the bigger picture? So we’ve done our greatest Java’s it’s rural moms. I’m going to address moms here. It’s not that single people don’t do a wonderful job, but as moms we’ve raised our children and we’ve spent our time and energy focusing there and now, you know, how can we use that passion we have for the planet and doing greater good in the world. So there’s a lot of topics out there. I will continue to update for the book. Some of the charts that you mentioned, like the, you know, the shopping list for CBD and things like that.

I will be posting the book launches April 13th, it’s available for pre-order now. But on April 13th, I will have some of those charts principles so that you could like print out or, you know, even just screenshot it and keep it on your phone, whatever works, save the planet, save a tree don’t print, whatever works for you so that you would have those resources available in your hands as you’re shopping as you’re going out in the world, but you don’t have to carry the whole book with you.

It’s a nice size book.

Speaker 1 (1h 46m 56s): If you’re going to take a book to the grocery store, I mean, this will fit in almost any purse it’s like for as much information as is in here. You know, it’s not a large book

Speaker 2 (1h 47m 9s): And that way actually intentionally so that it could be kind of, it’s obviously not a pocket guide because it goes way, way, much further than a pocket guide, but it was this design that it could be easily carried. And that’s also why we put it in paper bags, not hard book cover. So it’s lighter, a little bit more accessible to people. You could bring it out into the garden with you easily.

Speaker 1 (1h 47m 38s): Yeah. It’s it is absolutely fantastic. Well, thank you so much, Barb, and have a wonderful day

Speaker 2 (1h 47m 48s): Again. Please do stay in touch. I love I’m sure we can do something later down the road as your readers as well. Please stay in touch. If you visit ruralmom.com, there are all the links to my social avenues. You can feel free to contact me on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, wherever you hang out. My email address is on there. Feel free to email me. If you have a question like you’re Rosemary, I’ll do what I can. There’s also a section in the book which may help you on growing Rosemary, but I can take it further offline.

So if you’re still struggling, still having problems, just reach out. If I don’t know the answer, I know somebody who does as a researcher. That’s one of the coolest parts of my job. I get to know lots of people. Oh, bless your heart, Mike.

Speaker 1 (1h 48m 39s): Thanks. Bye. All right. I’m showing you.

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Getting Baked- Everything You Need to Know about Hemp, CBD, and Medicinal Gardening

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Getting Laid- Everything You Need to Know About Raising Chickens, Gardening and Preserving — with Over 100 Recipes!

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Computer generated transcript:

Speaker 1 (AKA JackieMarie): Hey, green future growers. Welcome to season three. I’m your host, Jackie Marie Beyer. If you’re new to the show, I hope you’ll subscribe on iTunes for free or follow on your favorite podcast app. And let’s get growing! 

Wanna donate to the show! You can “buy me a cup of coffee” where your donation goes directly to support the GREEN Organic Garden Podcast to help pay for things like hosting the mp3 files or maintaining the website.

It comes in just like $5 increments. It’s like a one-time thing. I think you can subscribe, but if you just want to donate $5, if you want to donate 10, 15, Debbie. Awesome. Buy me a cup of coffee.

Thank you so much for listening. You’re the best, but I did get your cute little book in the mail about getting everything you need to know about hemp CBD and medicinal gardening. Although true. Disclaimer, I haven’t read the whole book or anything near it. I did, I did thumb through it. It’s so packed full of information. It’s amazing. My husband picked up and he’s like, oh my goodness, this is like a, a medical book. This woman has here. Holy information. So

Speaker 2 (1m 38s): I always strive to make every word count. I absolutely hate picking up a book and, you know, getting like three pages worth of information and the rest is all like anecdotal story. So I’m the reverse. No, the pack, the information that I want people to get their money’s here. Yes, I absolutely garden. So my first book prior to this is called getting laid, which is about chickens, gardening and preserves.

Speaker 1 (2m 7s): Oh, I’m excited to hear about that too. Cause I recently like we’ve had chickens for 20 years, but they’ve kind of always been my husband’s domain and only in the last year really have I, if maybe a little longer, really had anything to do with him, I’ve just fallen in love with the chickens. Although it’s been very heartbreaking cause something got my little pet chicken.

Oh, I don’t know what, yeah, but I know, but our other chicken that we have, she’s been letting me like pick her up. And like I had no chickens were soft. Chickens were like going to be poking and hard biting me and like, they’re so sweet. And she just like, lets me pet her sometimes. And we had a grizzly bear come through, so we have to like bring them in every night and they actually sleep in cages in our bathtub.

So my husband gets like all electric fence built and oh wow. And figures that out. Yeah. We have had chickens for 25 years. I mean, we’ve had chickens almost since the beginning. We’ve been married for 27 years now and we’ve had chickens for a long time. Like even before we had running water and, and I always stayed away from them because I, I have a really hard time keeping things in cages and fish and fish tanks and stuff like that.

And it was one of them run free. And like recently I realized like our chicken pen is actually one of the nicest places for chickens to live in like the world. Like they have these keep them that like they don’t pet it. So they have bushes that give them shade in the summer and

Speaker 2 (4m 10s): Other than the predator problem. Right. Which

Speaker 1 (4m 15s): We did have a big problem. Once when I convinced my husband to let them out, not into the garden, but into the forest. And our neighbor dogs were able to break into that gate and wiped out a couple of batches a couple of times that way. But then he fixed that gate and patched it back up. And then in the last two years, there’s just putting huge issue with the grizzly bears in our neighborhood. And so now the fish, wildlife and parks people are like, you have to put electric fence up, you have to put electric fence up.

And the first time they posted that really, oh, we don’t need electric fence. We’ve lived here for 20 years and never had a problem and always had the chickens. And they came through and got one batch and we had a chicken survive it. And she laid a, or she had, we had just had chickens lay eggs. And they were the first time we had chicken, Bibi’s like actually grow up from chickens. And one of the BB survived the attack like after 30 days, all of a sudden this chicken Cubs out of the woods, out of somewhere, I don’t know where it was.

And so we had that chicken for like, I don’t know how long. And I finally get her a rooster. And two days later here comes a grizzly bear back and then, and got both of them. And then I got three BB chicks last summer. So July, I don’t know when, but one chick didn’t make it through the night. We had two. And then two days later here comes the grizzly bear and rips the entire back wall off of the chicken pen.

Their nests are, the wall is gone. Then he came back to the and then we started bringing them up to the housing, keeping in the bathroom. And then he came back from tour through our orchard, destroyed like ripped branches. Again, trees destroyed the fence. And so now Mike is like, it’s just getting to the point where he can dig into the ground. The frost has gone, that he can put some new poles in, fix the fence, get that back.

But he has so much, it’s like, you know, he’s trying to put up a new hoophouse and like cut down forest land to make room for a new hoophouse this year. And you know, we’re almost like usually he plant starts planning April 7th to the 14th. It has just been, and he’s got to deal with the chicken pen. So anyway, long story

Speaker 2 (6m 50s): Short. Oh my goodness. Well

Speaker 1 (6m 54s): Mike thinks it’s because so many people, we have so many people moving into in Northwest Montana and we’ve seen huge growth in last year with the pandemic. It’s insane. But even, or we were seeing just new people kind of moving in and he thinks it’s people having more free roaming chickens. And the bears just got the taste for the chickens. And now it’s like, you see on Facebook, it’s like, oh, we had the bear on this Kirk and it’s headed your way.

And pupil have posted. And my grandson got a picture of it on his go cam. My neighbor’s daughter got a picture of it. It’s a huge bear. And it’s just, it’s weird. You know, you see this giant bear. My mom’s like, I can’t believe you go. And I just want to see the bear. And I hike up in the woods and I usually see cows. I never see a bear. I carry my bear spray, but I’m much more likely to encounter a field of CA cause it’s free ranger, Montana.

So people will put their cows up there in the summertime. I have to say, I usually don’t go hike on that road. Like now in the spring, till the road, the road’s closed until June 15th and they usually don’t go hike up there. But I have this dog. I did go up there the other day. I’m a little more nervous because they’re just coming out of their dens. They can’t get a pie cause there’s still too much snow than I am during the summer months. Usually I’m teaching full-time man.

I can’t get up there right now anyway, but I’m not teaching. I’m working from home this year. Anyway, Barb. I don’t know why I’m going into all this because you said you wrote a book about chickens.

Speaker 2 (8m 40s): Yeah, no, I appreciate it. It’s great. Anyway,

Speaker 1 (8m 43s): Let’s introduce you and talk about you and Getting Baked and everything you need to know about hemp CBD and medicinal gardening. Maybe you can help me with my Rosemary and other things and, and I’m sure you’ll have tons of golden seeds for listeners. I will try. I do always tell everybody at the beginning of the interview, it’s super easy to edit. So if you need to let your dog out or get a drink or anything, like don’t hesitate to put me on hold.

Do you have any questions for me?

Speaker 2 (9m 19s): I’m sorry. You cut out for a second. So I, part of that

Speaker 1 (9m 23s): Hope I didn’t just ruin my mic. I kind of to go. I’ve been having a problem with Mike this morning. I

Speaker 2 (9m 32s): Can hear you now. Just here.

Speaker 1 (9m 35s): Okay. I’ll keep my hands off on my mic. I said, do you have any questions for me?

Speaker 2 (9m 42s): Well, I’ve gotten to know a bit about you now, so that’s really awesome. I was going to ask you where you were and you told me, tell me a little bit about the podcast though. Cause I don’t know as much. I know you have a degree in organic gardener podcast, which seems pretty self-explanatory but still what’s, what’s your goal? What are you hoping to talk to me about that I’m able

Speaker 1 (10m 6s): To help the reader. I was the Organic Gardener Podcasts for five years and last December, which was great because I interviewed Jeff . I don’t know if you know him. He wrote that teaming with microbes and teaming with nutrients and teaming with what’s the other one. I don’t know the teaming with series. And then he had just written the cannabis, DIY cannabis, but he’s like the, one of the leading soil authorities up in Alaska. I changed it to the green cause I was trying to niche down and my audience is like green future growers who want to see like an environment like we’re interested in the whole world going green and organic.

I mean, my listeners do tell me they want to know how to grow a better tomato, how to be more productive. But also I feel like there’s tons of podcasts out there and I definitely support the green new deal. I argue with my mom all the time, my brother, cause they can’t stand it Alexandria, Keystone Cortez, but I love her. And Jeff goes, he comes on and he’s the first interview after I’ve changed my name. And he’s like, my motto for 2020 is what would Gretta do? You know?

Like he w I just feel like my audience is a little more dedicated to climate change and creating an environmentally sustainable future and just, you know, supporting now I did do a big thing about the $15 minimum wage and green new jobs. And nobody has like taken me up on any of that stuff. So maybe it’s in my imagination. My husband was like, quit talking about politics. He’s like, you’re alienating people just teach people to grow food.

So I don’t know where we’re going, but we both are huge hemp advocates. We used to have a hemp business back in the early nineties. I am super frustrated that I can’t grow my own hemp, my own cannabis. We just legalized cannabis for recreational use in Montana, but they’re working. Our Republican governor and legislature is working on making it so you can’t grow it yourself.

You can’t sell it. You can possess it, but you can’t buy it where you’re going to get it. I don’t know. It’s super expensive to grow hemp here. Like you have to have like a $450 permit, which I’m frustrated because I want to be able to grow my own hemp seeds and hemp oil. Because as I’m a pescatarian who doesn’t really get to eat, a lot of fish, people are always like, you should, you know, eat hemp powder and you should use oil.

And it’s really good for you for hemp. And then we would love to build like a straw bale house and grow fields. I’ve haven’t been having access to him. And then we’re in this huge wagging place where the, you know, plum Kirk left because they cut down most of the logs that were of any value. They didn’t leave because of the environmental, shut them down. They come down, you know, we would like to see paper products and building materials, meet at a Hampton plastics that will biodegrade out of hemp and CBD products out there.

And just, there’s so many things hemp can do, you know? And then there’s the Rick Simpson cannabis oil like that. They say cures cancer, you know, like I’m just really frustrated with the whole hemp cannabis movement. Meanwhile, people gonna have an AK 40 sevens. I don’t know. Anyway, I

Speaker 2 (13m 56s): Am too. And so I wrote a book and I definitely wanted consumers to know what was out there, what was available and, and you know, how they connect us to that at the moment.

Speaker 1 (14m 7s): Yeah. And people should be able to grow as much hemp plants in their backyards as tomato plants. And, you know, it’s like, and then I see people posting in Facebook groups, oh, it’s a gateway drug. You know, what, what can the town pump and show me how many beer and wine coolers are available right next to the juice that the kids can’t buy cigarettes at the counter one. Talk to me about gateway drugs. That’s so much worse for you, but again, here we are 19 minutes in.

I haven’t even introduced you and I’ve been doing all the talking, so I’m going to be quiet. Here we go. That’s a little bit about my audience.

Speaker 2 (14m 52s): Well, we’re in sync. I will not get political. Cause it’s something I don’t do, but I am in sync with your audience and your point of view in terms of greening up the earth and our environment and living in symbiotic kind of lifestyle, sustainable lifestyle, where we’re taking care of the planet, which is a living organism just as well as we are. Yeah.

Speaker 1 (15m 18s): Oh. And then a lot of it started when I interviewed Tara Caton down at the Rodale Institute was talking about how good it is for our soils and as a cover crop. And like that’s where I kind of like started researching and was like, wow, look at all these hemp farms they have in Colorado and Oregon and Washington. And like I had no idea. And then there’s that whole business piece to it. So anyway, let me introduce you. That being said, I do have like a ton of new listeners, so I haven’t really turned anybody off.

Like my audience has grown huge in the last 12 months. There’s according to my stats, about 1200 people listening. Most of the time and most episodes have been getting close to 2000 downloads. So I don’t know that’s where I’m at numbers wise, whatever that means. So it’s a pretty group, big room. So anyway, here we go and welcome all you new listeners because something happened on November 29th, that we did get a bunch of new listeners.

And then I was on this homestead virtual summit recently. It seems like the numbers have been going up since then. And just, you know, I think there’s a big gardening trend in 2020 and 2021. So anyway, here we go. Welcome to the green organic garden. It is Tuesday, April 6th, 2021. And I have an awesome guest from Shepherdsville Kentucky here as Barb webs. Talk to us about her new book, getting baked, everything you need to know about hemp CBD and medicinal gardening, but I will say she has an awesome website that goes deep into all sorts of great things there too.

So welcome to the show, Barb.

Speaker 2 (17m 6s): Thank you, Sarah. It’s an honor to be here and I’m loving our conversation. I think your prompt, you cover stations are the best. So this is, this is fantastic. I’m glad to interact with your audience. And like I said, I think we’re all on the same page. Well, go ahead and

Speaker 1 (17m 21s): Tell us a little bit about your background and I’m shutting my mic off. So I literally have to turn it back on to interrupt.

Speaker 2 (17m 31s): Good. I’m enjoying, enjoying getting to know you a little bit about myself. Well, I, as you said, I have a website it’s called rural mom.com and they’ve operated that for about 12 years now. I am an organic green gardener and I’m very much an environmentally friendly, sustainable living expert. I’ve been in this field for about 20 years. I think you said you’ve, you’ve tweaked chickens for about the same amount of time I did.

And basically I, I came from a city background. So I grew up in Chicago, Illinois. I knew nothing about farming, but I knew a lot about conserving came from a, you know, blue collar family and my parents and my grandparents were all about reusing recycling, reducing waste. So that’s, that’s something I grew up with, which was fantastic. Gave me a great foundation and moved out to the country when I was in my twenties. And I decided to buy a farm, which is kind of hysterical.

That’s what you do, right? I knew nothing but being a researcher by trade, I’ve always been a writer and a researcher. And I worked in the tech fields for many, many years as a technical writer. I learned everything I absolutely could from interviewing people. I’m a journalist by nature. That’s what I went to college for. So very inquisitive and I began to learn so much that people were coming to me and realized that the point where I had a lot of knowledge to share that, that people just didn’t know.

And that’s when I started the website and got into writing mainstream books and articles in this field, I’ve been passionate about HAMP, as you have for many long, long time. It’s an incredible plant. It’s been stigmatized, as you mentioned, which is just crazy. And I think it’s coming though. I think there’s hope on the horizon. There are states that are beginning to allow home gardeners to grow and develop. Of course, Denver is obviously leading the way in this entire revolution that we’re seeing.

But I also realized, especially when CBD came onto the market as an early adopter of that particular medicine, medicinal, you know, natural medicinal, I saw so much confusion and nobody really knows what they’re doing. So I saw a need to share again, that experience and it became this, this book.

Speaker 1 (20m 7s): Why don’t you go into some of that? Because it, it like, that’s what drives me. The craziest is like the lack of information. And meanwhile, by having it be prohibited, we just push all that information underground and not getting it out there. And that’s what creates a lot of the dangers and people doing things they shouldn’t be doing with it. So, you know, you’ve had this amazing documented journey wanting to go in there.

And maybe, I dunno, like, are there myths and, and, and things you can tell us that are true about it and not true.

Speaker 2 (20m 46s): Oh, absolutely. There’s an entire chapter on that. I really dug in deep. And as we talked about in the beginning conversation, I tries to be nuts when people don’t. So I’m probably overkill on research. I talked to many people, there’s, I’ve cited a lot of people. I’ve done a lot of interviews with experts in the field and it’s all in this book, but I think the main myth, as you mentioned earlier, that people can’t get over. And it’s just because it was stigmatized in culture.

What back in the twenties, thirties, that cannabis as a plant, as a whole, which would include what we politely refer to as hemp, right? Because hemp is a low THC plant C being what makes you euphoric cannabis as a whole, including that strain has just been demonized. And it was classed as a drug in, in league with heroin, which is just insane. No one’s ever died from cannabis directly.

It’s very bizarre. So it actually has come down now in terms of what schedule drug it is, it’s no longer on the same level as heroin, which is progress. And you’re seeing a lot of state states come forward and, you know, changing it to recreational use, of course, with still some pretty stringent parameters. Although other states are opening up in Canada, of course has an entirely different take than the U S so there’s hope on the horizon.

I think there’s enough of us in the grassroots movement. I think there’s enough people seeing the true value of this, that it’s not just about the Foria, it’s not like picking up a bear, as you said, you know, but even a glass wine has medicinal properties, right? So there’s, if you can relate it, you know, maybe you get you for it from a few glasses of wine, but it’s proven for women over 50 drinking, two glasses of wine or two to three glasses of wine a week is actually super heart-healthy.

So there are medicinal qualities to some of these things that we stigmatize and hemp pep is, you know, to be the sort of red headed stepchild, right. Of the cannabis industry that sort of just got abused and neglected, and it can do so many powerful things. You know, there’s about 20 to 30,000 uses for hemp, as you mentioned, some of them, and that’s something we really need to look at them. And as we look at different compounds within the cannabis plant, like CBD, which has a dramatic anti-inflammatory property, as well as some other really interesting and neat things like sleep inducing and, you know, pain, reducing and people, the anti-inflammatory property and CBD alone as it’s been tested in Canada is 30 times more powerful than an aspirin.

So why are we not looking to these things? And we have to get past this whole myth that cannabis has been demonized. And that was primarily because of the drug industry that actually took this plant that had strong medicinal properties and people were benefiting from and say, no, no, no, no, no. We’ve got to create synthetics. We need something we can make money from. We need something that we can control. We don’t want people growing this in their backyard and getting their own pain cures.

Correct. And that’s that

Speaker 1 (24m 25s): By being underground and pushing people into closets and growing their own people ended up trying to get the most potent thing they could get from the smallest plant because they didn’t want, and that’s where we ended up getting the super over powerfully. I feel like I’ve talked to a lot of women and maybe it’s also because I read that book, the new Chardonnay, have you heard, have you heard of that book that Heather Cavett came out with and women want less powerful?

I, I feel like I’ve talked to a lot of women that talk about like, the stuff that people is growing is so potent and just wipes you out. And, and it’s like, that’s part of where this problem is coming from. Like by pushing it underground and people like trying to get the most potency, that’s where this high powered stuff is coming from. And like, wouldn’t it be nice if, if people could have varieties and like some that’s like good for when you got home from work or, you know, different than, you know, what you, I don’t know, just anyway.

And then also like you’re talking about like, would you be, you know, an aspirin, you know, people don’t think about taking an aspirin and driving down the road, you know, it’s something that’s whereas like taking something that’s more potent than two glasses of wine, you don’t want to drive down the road. And, but meanwhile, because it’s not regulated and people are just doing whatever, you know, there’s no dosage on the side of the thing or the dosages.

It’s very hard to control the dosages and different things. Like, and I’ve still heard about what are you sure about the other day somebody’s getting their whole hemp crop wiped out because the THC level ended up being too high, you know? Cause it’s kind of a hard thing to control when you’re growing a plant. But anyway, you’re going to talk about some of the uses. I don’t know if I threw you off there. Oh no. That’s okay. It’s

Speaker 2 (26m 41s): All good stuff. And it’s all true. We are seeing though, in, in states like Denver, where as you said, a variety of uses. So yes, by driving in underground, we basically demonized it and said, all hemp was good for all cannabis was good for was the euphoric effect. So of course people cultivated the plants to have more THC, more euphoric effect. And that’s what we began to see now have itself was still being used for things like rope and foreign countries have been using it for many years for a variety of things.

But, and not just for the euphoric effect in the United States, we seem to do that.

Speaker 1 (27m 21s): What else? Book? I’m reading the guy from Dr. Bronner’s. Yeah. There’s so many things.

Speaker 2 (27m 34s): So yeah, I, there there’s just so many uses for it. It’s incredible. We could solve the plastic crisis if we just made him plastics. So this is something we have agreed. Yes they do. They do. So this is something we really have to get on board with as, as a planet, as a community across the world. So, you know, there’s okay. You know, it’s, there’s so much to discuss. I, I have a little lost.

Where are we at?

Speaker 1 (28m 7s): I don’t know. I’m looking through your book and starts out with getting well, are you ready to get baked? Medicinal plants are affordable. Assessable effective, empowering medicinal plants are not a cure. If you find a medicinal plant or plant extra, here’s your elements. That’s fantastic. Okay.

Speaker 2 (28m 27s): Yes. So that’s another myth too is so a lot of people are looking towards cannabis, as you said, curing cancer. They’re not cures coming out of the medicinal world, but what they are are a huge support and a huge piece of what you can do to alleviate an ailments. And that’s important. So people with rheumatoid arthritis are benefiting from CBD, like crazy.

It’s, it’s not a cure, but it alleviates their symptoms. People with epilepsy, there is actually a patent and CBD drug, right? That’s not a cure, but it alleviates their symptoms. People are using THC heavy cannabis, you know, and they have cancer, I guess it’s not necessarily curing it, but it’s helping to alleviate their symptoms and helping their body to cure the disease. So there’s the big thing. We have to use these things in synergy with our body.

Our bodies are, so their sup itself is capable of curing us. Our bodies D

Speaker 1 (29m 39s): Is actually posting now that, that Rick’s them saying cannabis oil is proven to kill cancer cells in lab animals and other, which I was shocked to see now how we’re, you know, it’s web MD, but I do go to web MD a lot for just anything. That’s my number one site that I can do whenever I have any questions about, you know, do I have the stomach flu or do I have any kind of like they’re to me?

But anyway, we have all sorts of other things,

Speaker 2 (30m 19s): Human trials. So to say that

Speaker 1 (30m 22s): I love the research because it’s like you have a CBD product, tractor, wellness log, shopping list, cultivating and medicinal garden.

Speaker 2 (30m 36s): Yeah. Oh, there’s a lot of the book. So basically what I wanted to teach people is that not only have been CBD are wonderful medicinal products that can help alleviate and support your health needs, but there’s also just regular herbs that we’re using. You mentioned Rosemary and struggling to grow it. Rosemary is fantastic for many things. It has great medicinal properties. It’s also great. If you grow Rosemary and make a hair rinse out of it, it makes your hair nice and shiny and soft.

So I mean, there’s, there’s so many different things that these herbs do that we’re not utilizing them for. Rosemary is obviously a great culinary tool and it tastes fantastic, but there’s so many things we’re not doing with it from an aroma therapy standpoint, to a, like I said, a medicinal here at T to taking it, you know, for various ailments that we might have, or in support of our immune systems or whatever. You’re looking for a Rosemary as a fantastic digestive aid.

So using it, if you have digestive problems during a tea out of it, it also is an immune booster. It wouldn’t take it in higher doses actually helps our bodies produce a better immune system. So all of these things, again, my main point is they’re not necessarily cures and CBD may wind up being a cure for humans. We just don’t know yet. At this point, what we do know is that it works synergistically with our body.

It has been put on this earth to supplement our body and to help us with the basic needs that we have from immune system to sleep, to headache relief, to skincare, everything on this planet seems to have been designed to work synergistically. We all support each other. So that’s sort of the theme of the book is looking at these basic herbs and these that have been stigmatized and how they can actually work in your life to create a better holistic system for yourself.

Speaker 1 (32m 49s): This page 91 in here that says not just for the bees and butterflies growing envelope, flowers, like you were speaking of immune system booster, chives, lavender mustard, nasturtiums, pansies time and wild rose. Like this book, it talks about alleving sh alleviating stress. Colongeal a lavender mustard, Sage Wildrose lifting your mood, relieving headaches, sleep enhancers, digestive aid, some inflammation reduction, like talk to us about this growing edible flowers in your medicinal garden.

Yeah. So

Speaker 2 (33m 29s): In the same way that we look at herbs and I sort of wild flowers have always been a part of my medicinal garden, as well as some of them come from our herbs like lavender, right? Mustard, flowers, things of that nature. They’re actually coming from herbs, we’re using for other purposes, but the flowers themselves have medicinal properties and are edible. It is really interesting. I think the one that people are most familiar with is Rose Rose water is very popular.

I mean, no. Yeah, it is very popular in the cosmetic industry. You can buy rose water, it’s in the stringent, good for your face. People drink rose water and cook with it. Now it’s actually fairly common in the restaurant industry. So that’s some, but there’s not enough known about it or not. People don’t realize that you can actually grow it, you know, pick the rose hips or the leaves and use them for specific needs. You can drink rose water and it is a great inflammation reduction reduce

Speaker 1 (34m 35s): Certain kind of roses.

Speaker 2 (34m 39s): Yes. So what you want to grow is what’s called a wild rose. And I do talk about that in the book and tell about how to harvest it, how to grow it. But you want to grow wild roses have rose hips, domestic roses are those that are cultivated for your florist, perhaps do not. And so they’re not going to have the same use and there are a variety of different wild roses. But if you look it up online right now, you can find you just type in wild rose seeds or Wildrose plants, and you’ll find them available for sale pretty much any seed company.

If you don’t have them naturally on your property. Now I do have some naturally in our forests, which is kind of cool. And then I’ve actually purchased a few heirlooms rose varieties that I grow out front as part of my landscaping, but then I also use the roses for medicinal purposes. So that’s something I talk about the book too, which is really cool, is you can actually use all of these Herb’s herbs and spices roses, any flower as just part of your, you know, create your entire property into an edible landscape, that it’s not only great for the bees and butterflies and the wildlife in your area, but it’s fantastic for you when used in the right way.

Speaker 1 (36m 5s): You as interesting for like 15 years, I had a bottle of rose water in my purse, and that was like the only perfume I ever wore. And I would spray myself with rosewater like 20 times a day and never knew any of that. And we have wild roses. Like for my wedding, when I got married, it was like the sweetest thing. Like my husband’s friends brought us gifts. So many people that I had never even met Kim nor wedding and brought us gifts.

And this one woman brought me a rose hip necklace that I still, I still have, like in a box, those rose hips, that from that necklace that she made me, that’s still like all open the box and it still smells beautiful, but I had no idea that people drank the water or that I could really make it from my own. Like I just buy a bottle of the, what is it like the extract, the essential meal and mix it with some water.

That’s just what I’ve always done. Right. And refill my water bottle instructions. Or I see that. Yeah. I see that here,

Speaker 2 (37m 28s): Do that yourself. You can make your own rose water. You could make it into an extract that you could use for your perfume. Absolutely. There’s, there’s so many. I also have a recipe in here is my favorite for cardamom and rose mug cake, which I, well, it’s just a great way to use. So again, with, with, I’ve tried to cover absolutely every way to use all of these medicinal garden pieces within your lifestyle.

So I added some recipes, so you’re ingesting it. Obviously it’s just a treat, but it has some great things in it. The, you know, rose obviously does a bunch of different things from infant lectionary reduction to, you know, boosting your immune system and it’s getting it within the concentrated form, but also adding it to your natural way of living. So perhaps use it getting recipes together, a little boost in terms of, of what you’re doing.

I’m also teaching people to do that. And that one in particular, I showing people how you can put CBD in recipes because a lot of people do not like to ingest CBD directly. So I wanted to take that into consideration because if you don’t have an enhancer and a CBD oil, it definitely tastes like you just put a ball full of hemp in your mouth. And so tasty if for a lot of people, it’s not, I can’t say I’m a huge fan either.

Well,

Speaker 1 (39m 10s): So I big complaints in that Chardonnay buck is, is that they came up with like some kind of clear liquid that because it was the teeth that people like this is, it’s really about some chef guy who liked developed a way to get rid of the taste of the hemp and develop this liquid that they’re drinking.

That’s like a clear liquid that doesn’t have the hemp flavor, but man, this book has so much more, I should have looked to. I’m sorry. I should have looked at it a little closer before we got on the call, but because it goes a lot further than hemp. Like I just love all this about growing your medicinal. Cause I always grown herbs mostly just for the culinary purposes.

But a lot of these, you have both in here, like the culinary and the medicinal mixed together. Like I’m reading here, the herbs, the spices, that pair well with chicken and corn and fish and artichokes and the spirit Gus. And what goes with which I just gave my friend Felicia, I grew these peppers that you can make an, it says makes a great paprika and you’ve got your, it goes to artichokes, cauliflowers, silly react, chicken, corn, eggs, fish potatoes, pumpkin squash, sweet potatoes, tomatoes and Turkey parsley, Rosemary saffron, Sage Terragon time tumeric like you just medicinal garden time soup.

What would we use that for? Or let me,

Speaker 2 (41m 3s): You can just say this. Yeah. So you could enjoy it naturally as just a great suit because it is, and it has a lot of great herbs in it and properties, but it’s actually very good if you have a cold, because time is a natural reliever,

Speaker 1 (41m 22s): Oxidants mood boosting scent potential health benefits.

Speaker 2 (41m 28s): Yes. So time is really good for easing suggestion too. It’s it’s, it’s my favorite go-to soup when I’m not feeling well. If in fact I had a lot of it when I had COVID last year and it was, you know, it does work. It’s great. Herbs can really help support our bodies in many ways. And that’s what I wanted to illustrate. Also, the what’s not so clear to most people is okay, Barb, why are you talking about CBD and hemp and medicinal herbs? Like you said, it goes so much deeper than just him.

There’s a connection. And there’s a huge connection. Hemp is basically an herb and a lot of properties. Yeah. A lot of the same properties that you find in hemp, you’re going to find in other herbs, like for example, lavender contains Lena Lowell, which is a terpene that is found at home. And so they compliment each other so well that if you’re using my point of this was if you’re using hemp CBD to alleviate certain things within your body, whether it’s, you know, pain reduction, you want, you want to get some sleep, you want to alleviate insomnia, whatever you’re doing, you can use these complimentary herbs.

And when you do that, the synergy between them is just amazing because they contain some of the similar components. So for example, if you add lavender with your CBD, well, wow, you really got a relaxer there because they both have similar attributes, but yet each one takes it a little bit step further and its own direction. And so when you put the two together, they make an amazing reality relaxer. When you put Camma meal, in addition to your CBD, well, you should sleep like a baby because one of them is a sedative and the other one enhances your deep sleep.

So the combination of those two things just elevates both of the plants to a different level. And so that’s why I paired them because I don’t think most people understand the connection. We’re all sort of looking for one solitary thing that helps, oh, I’m going to go use cannabis to alleviate this, or I’m going to go use CBD to alleviate this. And you’re not looking outside that box of what else is in nature that works synergistically with these things.

So that you’re truly taking it to a different level. And the really searching done

Speaker 1 (44m 9s): Like here, you’ve got that little, little terpene goes with Bazell bee balm, citrus, coriander, lavender, margarine, mint, oregano, rose, and time. And then there’s just pages about which ones go with which, and how to, how to mix them. And then, yeah, there’s, there’s sleeping, which is so important to be able to get a amount of sleep. But also like you’re talking about, you know, like how long have I been looking for an alternative to chicken noodle soup besides one year my husband made me fresh corn soup.

That was when I was really sick. But how often can you get fresh corn soup? You know, Ooh, peaches was CBD and honey ricotta. Doesn’t that sound good? CBD honey Terragon dressing, grilled chicken with fresh CBD marijuana CBD infused garlic, mashed potatoes. Ooh, there’s the cardigan rose CBD mud cake. Wow. Yeah.

Heavy cream and CBD oil

Speaker 2 (45m 24s): Edit all my favorite recipes for sure. There’s many ways to cook with CBD and herbs. And I certainly spent a chapter telling people how to do that different tips. I actually interviewed chefs to what you’ll find in the book to get their tips and their experience. And I interviewed a few chefs that normally work with cannabis and CBD products and their cooking. And then I added in of course my favorite ways now I’m, I’m personally not the biggest fan of cooking with CBD because I’m okay with ingesting it other ways.

So I think that’s just sort of a hassle. It doesn’t really enhance the flavor of the recipe. It doesn’t do much for a recipe, but for some people who are just really sensitive to the taste and it’s a great way to just incorporate it into your lifestyle and get the CBD that you need and the herbs that boost that experience for you. Sorry,

Speaker 0 (46m 23s): I got lost in

Speaker 1 (46m 26s): Looking through, oh my goodness. This book, I got to tell you listeners, there is so much information packed in there. Well, what psych look at the questions really quick. So what did grow well in your garden this year? Barb, I used to ask my very first question is like, what’s your original garden memory? Like who are you with? What did you grow? Like, what’s your very first memory of being in the garden outside of Chicago, which I’m also a city girl.

I grew up 20 minutes from New York. Okay, cool.

Speaker 2 (47m 3s): So my first memories of the garden are actually in Chicago and my mother didn’t grow very many vegetables, but she did grow flowers, but my neighbor was Italian and she was from Italy. And so she had a full Portage garden in her little, you know, when you’ve got a quarter acre in the city, maybe a very small plot, but she, her entire backyard. And I would often stay there after school.

Cause my mother worked downtown and I would help lead in her garden. And that fascinated me and the smells that came from this woman’s house. Let me tell ya she’s Italian. So the ragged, all the garlic, you know, the Rosemary and I was thrilled by this at a very young age to see that type of activity going on within the city. And I think so that’s my first gardening experience.

It’s my first joy. Also, my grandmother lived in Florida, which I was kind of lucky as a kid. I got to vacation down there in the summer and they retired down there and she used a lot of fresh produce. She didn’t necessarily grow up, but she grew really fascinating things like aloe. And my first experience with that is she used it on my son burden. I, I, you know, as eight, nine years old and realize holy cow, like they, this thing from the ground just cooled off my sunburn and made everything so better.

How fascinating is that? And it was to me as a child. And so that’s developed a really, a lifelong interest in moving into this from a very young age. I had some huge influences, my first gardening experience on my own. Like I said, I bought a farm. So that was crazy. And I, I, I know it was that farm that

Speaker 1 (49m 6s): You’re at now in Kentucky. It’s not,

Speaker 2 (49m 10s): I was up in Minnesota. I moved to Minnesota and to Kentucky. So my husband works in the airline industry and we’ve moved around a bit, but he’s from Kentucky. And so we, we landed up here. We, we have a 15 acre farm now, which is just a sustainable farm for us and love it, my first gardening experience.

So I went nuts and planted like two acres. I think it was just in the same or close, got like a hundred chickens. And I knew nothing. And I just researched and read. And I went and talked to my farmer, neighbors who were the best resource for anything. These people had been doing it all their lives.

Speaker 1 (50m 5s): What was having 200 chickens late or a hundred chickens like for laying eggs or, or chickens or both, or

Speaker 2 (50m 13s): I did both. So it was kind of insane. It taught me so much. I was I’m that kind of person I, I dive right in and you know, my biggest concern, keeping them alive because I didn’t want to jeopardize anything. Even with the garden. My biggest concern was how do I keep all of this alive and thriving and, and how do I use it? And I had so much garden excess that I wound up getting pigs to eat. The access is kind of crazy, but in that I learned so much about nature and animals and how everything works and, and nothing, nothing has to be wasted for the chickens.

I w I did, you know, grow them for both meat and eggs. Cause my, my point at that point was I want to become sustainable. I just want to be my own kind of little produce store. Why are we wasting all these miles, bringing everything to these places? I realized like way back then, what was happening in the world and how we just had removed ourselves from this farming culture as a society and not understanding how much we can actually grow ourselves.

Even if you live in an apartment, you don’t have to be importing things from a different country, for example. So that’s sort of what my mindset was. And I had dug right in and I was working 60 hours a week and gardening 60 hours a week. You know, it was crazy. What was the struggle

Speaker 1 (51m 49s): With keeping them alive? Was it predator and you’re feeding them all or, I mean, number one, I knew like how much room did you have a pen? Like I can’t even imagine that. Yeah. So literally, I didn’t know.

Speaker 2 (52m 5s): So that was w like we wanted to keep them alive and healthy and happy, you know? So I was staying up late at night, just burning through books and talking to local farmers. And thank God I had a farmer next door who raised ducks. So they were able to teach me a lot about what kind of space they needed. And I had a huge, huge fence. And because we did have predators. Yes. So I was, you know, another thing and I lost two right on, early on from a predator.

I didn’t realize, you know, that possums and raccoons will attack your chickens. And so I, you know, was able to set up a fence scenario where they could free range without that concern. It was quite a big area, quite a big fenced in area that I had for them in a really nice big house that had builds that they could roost and lay eggs and, and be happy. Of course, a lot of the meat ones, you know, you only keep for about a year max before you’re going to reduce that.

So I did reduce down to just the layers at that point. And you realize that chickens are also great. I imagine you do use them for composting as well. I didn’t know that early on, but I realized they could be great composters of a lot of the herbs. And some of those things were very good for them too. So I learned so much about that through research, through trial and error and managed to keep the majority of them alive. So I’m pretty proud of that over the years I’ve continued to.

And like you mentioned earlier, they’re just great people. Don’t realize how domestic chickens can be, are very friendly, domestic pets, roosters, you know, they, they can go either way, but hands for the most part, love to be loved and love attention and love, great herbs and food and sprouts and everything else that you can pass their way.

Speaker 1 (54m 12s): You know, I can not figure out what these chickens or what this. Now I call her queen Juliet because I never paid so much for chicken. But when I had the little babies, so the little BB was called golden Eagle because when he was, she was born, she had this really golden head and this dark brown body. And she would sit on my shoulder and watch me work, like in the house, down in the garden. If I was reading a book while he was watering or sitting on my computer at my art desk or painting, she like just came with me everywhere.

She was so tiny. It was so cute. And then what happened like just one day I went down there and she just wasn’t there. It was, it was, I was working only on this podcast one night and it got after dark. And I just went down there about a month ago and all of a sudden there’s just Juliet. So now Juliet comes in, but she’s been letting me pet her. And now I need to get Juliette, a friend, but these are the first two chickens after 20 years that I’ve ever like held and petted.

And like, I like going down and cleaning out their cage and giving them fresh. Like I put a layer of newspaper and then they put some straw in there and she just started laying eggs. Again, like she hadn’t laid an egg from like October until I was just only make today. I think we’ve just got about a dozen eggs should last 12 days. She lays an egg every day and I want to get her a friend, but I want to wait until where are you going to give her a way? Or if we can figure out the electric fencing thing, the problem is Mike is trying to figure out, he thinks we need to fence the whole orchard because that bear came in and broke the apple trees too, which is like a hundred feet of fence.

And also that means every gate and there’s four gates. And they have to be like, if the fence is going to be, but I think it really only needs to be turned on at night. It seems like the bear came through five 30 in the morning. The times that it came, I don’t know. So we have to figure those parts out. And then I’ve been like in touch with the grizzly bear program, we did get on a list where they will pay for 50% of, but it’s first come first serve in Montana here.

And then again, it has to be a certain Juul. Like I was going to order. I was like, well, what if we just at least do the chicken coop and the chicken? She has like a 75 foot fence outside the chicken coop. That’s within the 300 foot of garden and orchard

Speaker 3 (57m 2s): Area that

Speaker 1 (57m 4s): Would at least do herb them a lake. How do we keep the, you know, that also keeps the dog in. And then what was his thing about that? And then, oh, the fish, wildlife and parks guy or the grizzly bear guy was like, it has to be 0.7 joules. And the, I found the solar electric fence that would do that 75 feet, but it’s only 0.2, five. So it’s not powerful enough for the beer. So it was just like, I was like, oh, we can afford this and we can get it.

And I’m just going to get it when we got the second stimulus check, I’m like, should I order it? You know, I’d been researching on Amazon. And then the grizzly bear guy sent me a video and I was like, wait, did that say, I go back to order the solar thing, like, oh, that’s only 2.25, it’s gotta be 0.7. So that didn’t work. So now it’s like, oh, but anyway, we talking about the Le oh, well, yeah. I do tell my listeners quite frequently, like the chickens are here for the poop and the eggs are just the cherry on top.

They are first and foremost are feeding our garden bed. Although once you get used to chicken, like it’s been like this crazy thing, like is hard to go back to buying eggs in the store. I feel so guilty whenever I buy those eggs. Because like I was telling you in the pre-chat, our pen is just so nice. It’s got trees, it’s got shade. It’s got these bushes that the chickens don’t eat. Like there were, there was this one part where the chickens, like most when I see people, chicken tractors and I see places on mine, the chickens are in this just pure dirt, which I am realizing she likes to take chicken bass.

Oh, this was the other thing my husband about all winter long. I’m like, you mean to make her place that she can go. She doesn’t want to go out. She

Speaker 0 (58m 60s): Won’t be out in the snow. If I put her out in the snow

Speaker 1 (59m 2s): And I lay the hay down. So she’s not walking on the snow and try to make her place and feeder, she just wants to be in that chicken coop. Both of them want to be in there. I could not get them to go out all winter long, no matter what, even for 10 minutes on bright, sunny days, I’m like you guys go out there and get some fresh air. I would like walk them out for a little bit. They don’t want to have anything to do it. They want be in that chicken coop. And now she’s been coming out and she’s been hanging out a little more just in the last two or three days.

So like I had all these preconceived notions about chickens based on me, but really what they want. And so like, again, I’m saying we have this really, really nice chicken pen. If I can just figure out how to keep that grizzly bear out of there. And then whatever got my little Eagle, which we’re thinking was maybe an owl. Maybe she like, she, little Eagle can get over the fence or she could Juliet. Doesn’t seem to go over the fence.

It’s a six foot Heights deer fence. It keeps, but has never fallen over, but little Eagle would fly over it. And I’m wondering like, was she like mom, mom it’s dark. And all of a sudden he looked up from doing this podcast. I was just trying to finish for these guys. Cause I have to return them within 24 hours. And I was like, oh my gosh, it stark out. And I went down to get the chickens and just, we’ve never seen her again. There were no feathers. There was nothing. So we don’t really need a weasel to get in there.

Did I think maybe she hopped over that fence and owl or a Hawk garter.

Speaker 3 (1h 0m 43s): But anyway, back

Speaker 1 (1h 0m 47s): To the garden question, we should just get to the root of things because you’re probably like I gotta go Jackie. And how long is it gonna ask? Like, do you want that at all least favorite activity to do in the garden? Something you gotta force yourself to do.

Speaker 2 (1h 1m 4s): And Jackie, I’m happy to talk to you as long as you want. I have carved out time for you least favorite thing to do in the garden. I absolutely love to garden. Like I just love to be outside, but I don’t think anybody likes pulling weeds, at least the invasive ones. So I don’t pull a lot of weeds because there are ones I leave up, especially dandelions, things of that nature that are just great for the wildlife and the bees and the butterflies.

And realistically, the only thing that separates a weed from a herb or spice is us. Whether we prefer it or not. So that’s, that’s, I guess that would be my least favorite. But even that I don’t mind. Cause I just, I absolutely love being outside in the garden, connecting with nature, putting my hands in the dirt, you know, getting down into the reality of it, least favorite would be if something fails, that’s really frustrating when I have a big, beautiful, healthy plant.

And you know, maybe I did something stupid or mother nature is just not cooperating.

Speaker 3 (1h 2m 14s): That’s no fun.

Speaker 1 (1h 2m 15s): I just sent an email out to some of my listeners day about how many plants have you already killed this spring? Cause I’ve killed like two trees and several w oh just, and then last night my husband sent me down and I planted our transplanted summer rugala I transplanted his basles. He only had, or not B-cells broccoli. He only had six broccoli. I’m like, why did you send me down there? Because like before he even got out of the house, I’d broken truly leaves off of these babies.

And then why did you send me to go do that by myself? And then I covered them with the row cover and it got down to like 25 degrees. So I’m scared to even go look and see if they meet it. But I’ve been trying to take over more of what’s in this 300 foot of garden around the house this year where he plants a mini farm that is also its own like 250 something feet of fence.

Plus he’s got these. He just has so much. So I’ve been trying to take over more of the garden area. And so this isn’t my area. So this was like, I planted a rugal and lettuce seeds last night and, and what else? And then they transplanted some BB Arula because he, I, I killed two batches, but I had one batch, but he told me this morning, he’s like, look, your snapdragons are doing good. Your mirror golds are doing good. Just some things are always going to die, but it was not easy getting that bed ready and pulling some of those weeds were so tough.

Like the grass. Yeah. Trying to get that out. And what was one of the other things that I was really struggling with? I don’t know but anyway, on the flip side, what’s your favorite activity?

Speaker 2 (1h 4m 12s): Oh, harvest hands down harvest. Wait, what? I can pluck that first. Jerry’s a Vader off the tree, right? Or clip that first thing of Bazell Rosemary, whatever part, just the smell, the scent. A lot of things don’t even make it from my garden sometimes. Cause I’m just out there eating it, BB asparagus in the spring. They never

Speaker 1 (1h 4m 40s): Make it to the house. I don’t even cook them or anything. So good. I see my chives are growing and just things are like, it just seems like in the last week, how far things have come that are down there. Yeah. And there’s nothing like fresh herbs, like even fresh dried herbs, like a month ago I bought, you know, like the plugs that you buy in the produce department. I bought a Rosemary. I couldn’t find a Bazell.

They were all out of, I did finally find, I think a Bazell down in Whitefish, but I bought two Rosemary’s, two sieges, a mint. And the one beasel that made it into four plants, the Bazell all died, but I dried it and having that fresh dried beasel even, and the Rosemary’s died, but having the fresh dried, my husband’s like, why do you have this dead plant kitchen table? And I’m like, I’m like crumbling it into my soup each night, even though it’s still dried.

And it was right there. I finally did pull it off and put it in a jar, but oh, isn’t that flavor? There’s just nothing like fresh dried flavor compared to those spice charged by full of dry. Like that stuff is so old and just has no flavor. And they’re so expensive besides it’s just crazy to me. What people that day for herbs, I’m like, oh my gosh, I haven’t bought in a regular snow or since I’ve lived here, I don’t think I re I usually have enough Bazell that I dry in the fall or I usually have a fresh base on my windows.

So it just, it kind of depends. I don’t know. But yeah, without a doubt and my Sage, I was able to harvest dried out of my garden all winter this year. I love to put fresh siege with butter on ravioli, have to have ravioli in butter and cheese sauce. Anyway, what’s the best gardening advice you’ve ever received.

Speaker 2 (1h 6m 53s): Oh, the best gardening advice I’ve ever received. That’s a good question because I’ve received a lot, especially since I’m a researcher. There’s, there’s so many, I think early on was just, you know, patients and not to be afraid to try again or try a different way because some people do not, and it’s just true. Some people just do not have an act for gardening. And I always tell them, you know, you can still grow stuff.

You, you can, you just have to find out what works for you. I mean, whether it’s all right, so maybe you can’t grow it in the soil, but if you ever tried aquaponics, some of the machines they make are fantastic. You still get fresh herbs, lettuce right on your countertop. And there’s really nothing to it. You pour some water and a cup and make sure it’s got a plant food. And I think anybody can do that. So there’s, it’s, it’s really finding what works for you and not giving up. I think that is the best advice that I’ve ever had because just because they can’t grow something, you know, there may be 10 other ways to grow it that I haven’t looked at.

And that has worked. And also soil health is just a huge, I think we, we talked about that really early in our conversation with the person that you interviewed with microbes, soil health is important in a garden and for the success of your planting. And most people don’t realize that. And so they planted in the ground and then nothing grows or just one thing grows and they think they did something wrong. Well, what they did wrong is they didn’t test the soil and treat the soil for what nutrients it needed prior to putting the plants in the ground.

So that’s, again, if you haven’t had success in your patch of land, go find out what’s in your soil, go find out what’s lacking. You can take and get a free test at any extensions and see, you know, in the county there’s tests you can pay for as well. If you happen to live too far from an extension service, or don’t have that in your area, that’s like hyper important. And if you really think you have crappy soil, like I lived in charge of for awhile and we had clay heavy amount of clay in the soil.

So it was very difficult to grow certain things. One of the first things I did, and this is another tip, there’s just so many tips that are great, you know, go find out what your neighbors are growing successfully and, and ask, you know, what grows well in the soil that you have number one, but then what are they growing successfully that they did something different with, you know, you can make a raised bed, you can planting containers, you can control your soil environment. So even if you have a quote unquote Crowdy soil, you know, there are alternatives that you can use to make that work for you.

So I think really be flexible, be patient and you know, know that there’s more than one way to do something.

Speaker 1 (1h 9m 52s): Oh my gosh, these are all such great tips. And you know, I’m like the perfect example. Like since I started my podcast, I’ve gone from brown thumb to green thumb for sure. But I still struggle. And like, speaking of that one, hemp is really good for building your soil. So another reason we should be growing camp and we should have our big farmers growing hemp in there, you know, as a rotating cover crop, but also like one of the mistakes I always make it.

So maybe there’s a listener out there that does this. Like, I always think like that brown spot look there’s dirt there. We should put the plant biggest like fallacy. Like it’s like, you should be looking where stuff is growing. And I still do that today. Like I’m still like wanting to plant this one area. And my husband’s like, the reason nothing is growing there is because when I built the house before you were here, that was the mill site.

And they’re like still, probably like oil that dripped out of the mill right there. I don’t know what, and he’s like also I hauled in like a ton of gravel, like is a flat spot because that’s where there was a road underneath the mill and quit trying to grow there. You’re never cause I’m like, why don’t you move the chicken house over there? Cause there’s kind of like this old frame from when he had like this greenhouse there, this is the other thing he’s like the reason we’re not using that greenhouse is because it doesn’t get any sun.

And I would have to cook that giant tree that you’re always like, don’t cut that tree down next to it, to grow. Do you want me to cook the tree? And I’m like, no. And he’s like, look, I always pick the worst spots to grow still, but I love the I’m thinking like I’m taking this copywriting course. And I’m thinking, finding what works for you might make a great heading or title for this podcast episode or 10 other ways to grow something like your persistence.

And I was just interviewing somebody the other day, who was like, I’ve been trying to grow watermelon radishes for 10 years now. And finally that they grew well last year. And I’m like, wow, if you’ve been trying to grow radishes for 10 years and no wonder, because I tasted those watermelon radishes at the farmer’s market and I’ve tried to grow them and we haven’t had much luck. And, and so I was like, well, if you’ve been doing it for 10 years and haven’t had much luck, maybe we need to just keep trying and that whole persistence and finding what works for you in your space.

And then in talking to local gardeners, like my husband, I wrote this thing called the organic Oasis guide book. And in there I’m like introverts wanted like, even if you’re shy and you don’t like to talk, don’t worry. Cause gardeners just like you will do a lot of the chalking if you’re just a good listener. So awesome advice. You had just been dropping tons of golden seeds, Barb, and I’m going to try even harder not to interrupt you. Cause I just put a post out somebody listeners yesterday.

I’ll quit interrupting my guests. I’m sorry. I promise. And here I am fucking more than ever anyway, Barb, what’s your favorite tool. If you had to move in, can only take one tool with you. What could you not live with?

Speaker 2 (1h 13m 23s): Oh, good. So perspective as just a simple spade. I think you can do so much with it. You don’t really need all of these other fancy things or maybe a shovel, I guess if I want to do bigger plan. So

Speaker 1 (1h 13m 46s): Herbs got me tips for harvesting herbs that maybe we haven’t heard

Speaker 2 (1h 13m 52s): That you haven’t heard, but I’m sure everything is out there. It’s obviously a resource. A lot of it, each herb is, is different. So that’s a real tough one. I think what’s my best tip is to use them fresh whenever possible, especially those that can be used fresh because you’re going to get the max benefit from the medicinal properties of that plant. Secondly, then look towards freezing it if that’s possible. Because again, you’ll preserve the most nutrients and the best qualities of that plant before you dry it drying is great, but you do lose some properties of the plant.

So that’s probably something that I don’t think a lot of people look at and in that case then my best or tip ever is most people try to plant big patches of herbs because you know, they’re, they’re intense as well, dry it and use it throughout the winter. That’s cool. But my suggestion is to cycle plans. So instead of a, let’s just say instead of a, you know, three square feet of herbs, just plant one and then a few weeks later, plants plant another ones so that you’re continuously harvesting what you need and using it fresh, especially if you are looking towards a medicinal standpoint.

And then of course the last batches, that’s what you’ll freeze or preserve in a different manner. Maybe you alcohol curate or vinegar, curate, or any number of the ways that actually teach you to in the book. And each one has its different attributes and properties and uses. So that’s probably something I don’t hear a lot from anybody in terms of cycling. You’re planting. Everybody seems to want to tell you to put it all on the ground at once. And that’s, to me is sort of a misuse.

If you, especially, if you’ve got a longer growing season. Now, if you have a shorter growing season of Montana, you probably do for certain herbs, but like you said, Sage grows throughout winter. Often there are herbs that will continue. Rosemary will continue to grow through colder conditions. So why not plant smaller matches that have it every month so that you’re continuously harvesting fresh because you’re going to get the best for your body, the best for the planet, the best for that earth, the best growing conditions as it’s not competing with other plants,

Speaker 1 (1h 16m 23s): I was gonna say, cause I did see something somewhere about freezing herbs. Like what do you do? Like do you wrap in shrink wrap or put it in the Ziploc? Cause I did see something the other day about somebody pulling the herbs out of the freezer. And I was like, wow, I never do that. Like how do you put herbs in the freezer? Do you put them in ice cube trees or you put them in a Ziploc or do you have to like keep a stem separate how’s that work?

Speaker 2 (1h 16m 59s): Okay. So yeah, that’s great. They, it works different by urban and I’ll discuss that in the book too. But on a nutshell, my two favorite ways, yes, you can freeze a lot of herbs just hole. And I prefer a vacuum system rather than as a black bag, which is kind of a lot of moisture to get in. If you vacuum seal it, of course, you’re going to just preserve it as max and freeze it. And there are a lot of herbs that take very kindly to that. There are some that don’t for example, Bazell Faisal degrades upon freezing.

As we know if you’ve ever grown Bazell and you haven’t frost, you just lost your plant. It’s a very cold, sensitive plant. It also changes the flavor. So that’s one that I’m not going to freeze, but for others that do very well, Rosemary in particular, just throw it in a vacuum seal bag, you know, on the stem, you don’t have to take it off. You can just stem it, all, throw it in a vacuum seal bag, throw it in the freezer. And when you’re ready to use it, take it out of the freezer, let it get to room temperature, and then, you know, take the leaves off as you normally would to make a tea or cook with it or whatever you happen to be doing ice cube tray method is another one of my favorites.

A lot of herbs take really well to this mint is my absolute favorite for doing the ice cube method because I will then throw them in drinks and the summer. And that’s amazing. Especially mint ice cubes in grapefruit juice is like the bomb. And it’s so good for you and so healthy. So there’s different things you can do with those ice cubes. Otherwise you just pretty much throw the ice cube in a strainer, let all the ice melt and then use the herbs.

Now of course, when you freeze some herbs, the properties will change slightly. So for example, if your ice pew freezing mens, it’s going to get a little bit more soggy. So it’s not going to chop as well if you’re using it in a recipe. So you might want to consider chopping it before you freeze it. So just think about what you’re going to use it for. If you’re going to use it in recipes, then go ahead, chop it, throw it in the ice cube during the ice cube. And you already have your chop meant for your recipe. If you’re just going to use it for tea or to enhance strength than just leave it whole seminal, you know, chop it into smaller pieces of course, to fit into your ice cube container.

But that’s, that’s all you need to do. And so many of the things that, you know, obviously one of the best ways to preserve ginger roots or tumeric tumeric is I can never pronounce it right. Is to freeze it and then just great what you need as you need. It just different things. Many, many herbs and spices take very well to freezing and it just preserves. It’s the second best way to preserve the majority of, of plant compounds and plant matter and everything that is great about that particular plant.

Speaker 1 (1h 20m 4s): So can you take like a piece of ginger, put it in the freezer, take it out great a little bit and put the rest back in the freezer, but that’s exactly what I’m saying. Wow. Oh my gosh. Because I, the, I hate, I always buy rooted ginger and I use it for one meal and then I ended up throwing the rest away or in the compost and I always feel guilty. So don’t, don’t buy any for a long time and I love ginger.

I didn’t know you could do that. That’s awesome. Great tips there.

Speaker 2 (1h 20m 41s): Right. And it will preserve, it will preserve it for a long time. That happens to a lot of people. They don’t realize, of course you convert cellar ginger as well. And if you keep it in a cold dark place, it will last a little bit longer too, but you know, lights and well, I

Speaker 1 (1h 20m 58s): Just keep it in the fridge, but I just don’t use it enough and it ends up going bad. But that freezer tray, and then just like the whole mocktail, I think people are, are really getting into, you know, fancier drinks, flavored drinks, adding fresh herbs, you know, like who is it? Ayana Garten. And most of the McCarthy are just about to come out. I’ve been waiting any day. Now they’re going to do like a webinars on, on like, you know, those kinds of drinks.

And I put a thing out to my listeners. Anybody want to have mock tails and just, I interviewed a woman who sold herbs, grew herbs, had an urban farm and was talking about how she, one of her big markets was bars by men for their drinks was where she, and I just thought that was so fascinating. And just so I think so many of us with the pandemic were drinking more. So we’re looking for fresher, healthier options at night because maybe we’ve consumed more alcohol.

And then I know for me personally, with the shift with daylight savings, staying up later and like we’re not even having dinner till seven o’clock at night, instead of like, I was asleep by seven o’clock a month ago, and now it’s not even getting dark until nine o’clock here already in Montana last night. That’s I didn’t even go down to plant none of that stuff that I planted. I was telling you about at the beginning, the, on, in the, not the bees, all the broccoli in the rugala that was all after seven o’clock last night.

And it was still bright laid out. It was really nice down there and the sun was shining. It’s certainly didn’t feel so late, but yeah, being able to have something that pushup grapefruit and mint, I would never think of putting them

Speaker 2 (1h 22m 57s): Other thing and check out page 180 1. Feel like that. Since you just talked about it, curating artists in cocktails from your herbs. All right. Well, it’s funny.

Speaker 1 (1h 23m 10s): Our next question is what’s your favorite recipe you like to eat or cook from the garden? Or did we kind of just get through, do you have a favorite recipe or did we talk about it already talks about it? I have many, but I will say, oh yeah,

Speaker 2 (1h 23m 25s): I am huge fan of garlic. Like, and Bazell so we make a lot of Italian food pizza. It just, the taste, the flavor, the flavor profiles on those two particular plants are amazing. And of course adapt to Italian food very, very well. So that would be probably those are two herbs. Like I don’t want ever want to live without my, my cooking would suffer. I think I use garlic.

It’s just about everything, but I do have, right.

Speaker 1 (1h 23m 58s): My mom was Italian. I grew up in growing up on the Mediterranean diet and she was, she studied like gourmet magazine and just always was a fantastic cook. Oh, look at this rose pedals and Brandy mint and rum, Terragon and bourbon. Oh, you do have just tons of pairs. Well with, oh, listeners, you’ve got to get this book. What was I going to say?

Yeah, great. Garlic and onions go into everything.

Speaker 2 (1h 24m 35s): They’re both so great for our immune systems too. And I suffered from inflammation. I have Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. So my thyroid has gone autoimmune disease. And anything I can get that has anti-inflammatory properties just helps me function like a normal human being. So garlic is a good friend onions as well. And that helps you with your thyroid.

Well, it helps reduce the inflammation in my body. So my thyroid is, is gone and, and you know, that’s I, so I look for every ounce of support I can get for everything that the thyroid effects from my digestive system to inflammation in my body to serotonin thyroid. It’s amazing what all this little thing in our body regulates and what not having one, obviously I do have to take a synthetic drug to help myself.

Well, that’s why

Speaker 1 (1h 25m 36s): I was like, I, cause I’ve been taking that L thyroxin the Synthroid for years and I’m just like, I’m always asking my doctor. Is there something I can do? So I don’t have to take this Synthroid or at least get on a lower dose because it seems like every time I go back, they want me to, you know, every year I have to go get the thing in every year, they want me to take a higher dose. I’m just like, isn’t there something natural. Isn’t there. Like something I can do to my diet to get off of this. I just hate having to get that stupid, stupid pill every day.

And it could this be. And then I’m curious because my husband is not a fan of garlic and onions. And as someone who grew up putting that in everything I’ve really liked since we’ve been married, I have like reduced, like now I’m almost sensitive to it where like, I can’t eat as much garlic and onions as I used to. And I’m curious like, is that part?

Speaker 2 (1h 26m 34s): I think so. I think there’s some merit.

Speaker 1 (1h 26m 36s): My brother both, I think have to take it to, and they certainly have no lack of garlic in their

Speaker 2 (1h 26m 43s): Lives. So there’s a lot of merit to it. I’ve done a lot of research on that as well, obviously, because it’s a condition that affects me. I’m not an expert, but I do have to take a synthetic. I have for the last 20 years, 19 years, I’ve got it. I developed it during pregnancy, which is common, I guess, and for whatever reason, but it happens. Well,

Speaker 1 (1h 27m 8s): It seems like 90% of America takes it. Like everybody I talked to. So he’s like, yeah, I take that. Yep. Yeah.

Speaker 2 (1h 27m 16s): I know. Well, they studies have shown that fluoride in our water is a partial reason why some people have developed thyroid issues over time. Now mine is an autoimmune disorder, which they think is more hereditary, which several members of my family has other various autoimmune disorders. So that’s probably just luck of the draw. And my thyroid doesn’t work at all. Like it’s gone and it still exists in my body, but it does nothing.

And so I’ve had to take, and I also had a problem early on, as you did where it was just increasing every year. And I was like, what? Now I have found that I’ve been able to reduce it slightly and stay stable by really heavily working on reducing inflammation in my body. And what that does is it just allows everything to work better. So if you’re taking a pill and let’s say you’re consuming a lot of inflammatory foods like sugar, for example, is wildly inflammatory food and you’re taking Synthroid well, the Synthroid then has to combat through that as well as trying to support your thyroid in doing its general function.

So I have found that taking care of different key points within my body, like, you know, using ashwagandha to promote my serotonin developments, using a lot of herbs to reduce inflammation in my body, watching what I eat. And I know I still eat some inflammatory foods that by choice at times I don’t want to completely alter my lifestyle like bread, for example. So, you know, I will occasionally delve into that and I know what I’m doing, but for the most part, if I really work at it, I was able to reduce not only the amount of Synthroid I was taking, but also my cholesterol levels dropped dramatically because I was reducing inflammation in my body and eating better foods and, and taking an approach to help support the Synthroid.

So it worked the best that it possibly could within my body. And that has made a difference in over time. I’ve just stayed stable then with that dose. So I, I think there’s some merit personally, it’s worked for me. There’s not a cure necessarily. I haven’t, I haven’t just keep hearing

Speaker 3 (1h 29m 53s): Over and over

Speaker 1 (1h 29m 54s): My head listeners. So my friend Patty and I have been doing this thing called grow live, and she did a whole workshop on, you know, inviting beneficials and friending, friending the beneficials and, and unfriending the bugs and passed some whatever. But ultimately what she talks about is healthy plants will, you know, bugs and pests. Aren’t going to attack healthy plants and you are going to have some plants that just aren’t as healthy in your garden as you are.

And it sounds exactly like what you’re saying, like the healthier I can rank my body, the more it’s going to be able to build my immune system build, you know, reduce inflammation, like a lot of these things that you’re talking about. And so if I can just be the healthiest I can be, you know, I’ve been striving and I’ve been reading Shaylene Johnson lately. And she talks about, you know, just really at least shoot for 80%. And I do feel like one of the reasons I don’t have diabetes for somebody who is super overweight for, I I’m always, I’m like, how can I be so overweight?

Like for as much as I tried it, like last summer I was walking 75 miles a month, which isn’t that great. I’d like to get up to three miles a day, which would be closer to 90 on an average, but at least like, it was a big improvement like March and April, when the pandemic first hit, I was only getting like, you know, my wild meter, like 30 miles a month. And so to be able to push it up to 75 was a big thing last summer. And most like twice a week, I was walking seven miles with my dogs.

And even though it was slow, it was like, yo, this is better than a lot of people. I feel like I’m fairly healthy, but just not enough. But you’ve given me so many tips here that I feel like I hope I, you know, I feel like there’s probably a lot of listeners that are just getting tons of great information. Because again, like you said, I think a lot of us in this country are struggling, but I am like, I feel badly. We’re almost two hours in this interview.

So you’re probably like,

Speaker 2 (1h 32m 13s): All right, I’m glad

Speaker 1 (1h 32m 15s): Internet resource. Where do you find yourself surfing on the web? I always love to talk to researchers. I was just, you know, when the funny talks about garlic yesterday, I was editing my interview. I did with Jesse Frost from the No Till Growers. And we had quite a conversation about garlic because that is one of their number one sellers and him and his wife built, bought a new farm and they’re moving. And he said, he talks about on the show. One of the biggest things was we’re not moving until the spring with the people who are buying our farm from, let us get the garlic in, in October because he was so worried because they plant like 10,000 garlic plants or something like garlic and carrots are his two biggest sellers.

And like, that was one of their biggest things was how are we going to get this garlic in to the new? But I think the new, the farm that they were going to buy, they left them plant it or they leased the field or something. But anyway, where. Where do you find yourself surfing on the web research? Oh, that was it. Jessie’s a researcher too.

Barb (1h 33m 22s): I, I, yeah, I think some of us are just born that way. I am. I’ve been always so curious about everything and it was what intrigued me about going into journalism. I always wanted to ask the questions. So NCBI, which is the US National Library of Medicine, national institutes of health website is my number one go-to because I absolutely love finding out what’s new in research. What people are doing with different herbs, cannabis, any anything in the medicinal arena.

And it’s, so it’s not just about drugs. There are, there’s a lot of research going on with plants and cannabis in particular. And so NCBI, I think it’s NCBI is the actual they, and you’ll see me cite some of that in my book, actually. So if you look to the very back end notes, you’ll see,

Speaker 1 (1h 34m 25s): Is it this national national center for biotechnology information?

Speaker 2 (1h 34m 31s): No. So it’s the NCBI. And that is the US National Library of Medicine, national institutes of health website in the end notes in the back of the bus. You’ll see me cite them a few times specifically for some research just happens, be one of the best websites if you’re looking for what’s happening in the research world for a particular condition or with a particular herb or with a particular plants.

Yeah. It’s a library of everything. Every paper that’s been written, every experiment that’s going on. So it’s really great. You will go down the rabbit hole very easily if you just search cannabis, for example. And you know, this book took two years to develop. So I did go down a lot of rabbit holes and wound up talking to some of the researchers as well, to get more layman’s terms on some of what was going on.

But I happen to love that. I do love going down the rabbit hole of research. I love exploring and finding out as much as I can about a particular topic. That just happens to be a really hardcore website if you’re looking for scientific information. So it is one of my favorites to head towards when I’m looking for something.

Speaker 1 (1h 36m 12s): I’m just going to say what I, when I am looking. So there’s the US National Library of Medicine,, the national Institute of health, which is www.mlmdnih.gov. And then, then there’s also the NCBI.NLM.NIH.gov  So it must be like part of their website, the national center for biotechnology information is part of the  National Library of Medicine, national Institute.

Yes, I believe so. I guess, but the US National Library of Medicine.

Speaker 2 (1h 37m 1s): So that would be a more, yeah, that would be more broad way to look at it.

Speaker 1 (1h 37m 9s): Awesome. And then how about a book besides your three books, which we’ll get to in a minute.

Speaker 2 (1h 37m 16s): Just say mine. I don’t, I honestly don’t have a go-to book in this arena. I’ve read so many great books and yeah, I that’s really tough. Like I’m not the type of, I can’t even tell you what my favorite song is. Like, I’m not that type of person. I’m sort of eclectic and I love everything and I, I love so many things of equal importance.

One of the books that I think early on, I used what’s the, I’m trying to look up the exact name. It’s a huge book. And it’s like the homestead encyclopedia or something, or is it the The Encyclopedia of Country Living

 I might be it, is it the encyclopedia of country living? I think everybody should own this book, especially if you’re just starting out.

Speaker 1 (1h 38m 20s): It’s cool. I don’t have that one. And I don’t know that one.

Speaker 2 (1h 38m 25s): Then its 50th year. I believe it is an amazing resource. It was for me early on. I would say I don’t go to it now very much, but in the beginning, like if you think my book is chock-full of stuff, that is something that should be on everybody’s shelf, especially if you’re just starting out or maybe even if you’re mad, if you’re an expert already, I don’t know if they’ll gain as much from it, but it’s called The Encyclopedia of Country Living and I believe it’s yeah, I’ve just pulled up the 50th anniversary edition, the original manuals for living off the land and doing it yourself by Carla Emery.

Encyclopedia of Country Living, 50th Anniversary Edition- The Original Manual for Living off the Land & Doing It Yourself

The Encyclopedia of Country Living, 50th Anniversary Edition: The Original Manual for Living off the Land & Doing It Yourself


And it is gold. If you are looking to do anything from raising chickens, pigs, beekeeping, baking, gardening, preserving, like everything is in there, everything that was done in not only. So it’s not only like what was done is it’s really realistically, like if you lived in the pioneer days, absolutely everything you would need to know to live off the land is in the spot.

So there’s things you wouldn’t even think of or necessarily do, but we can do. So it’s really cool. Like you make your own cheese and spinning wool and all kinds of crazy stuff. That’s really cool. And, and we’re moving back to now, you know, how do you, if you want to be completely 100% sustainable, this buck, I’ll tell you how to do it and get you a little acre of land and go start a town. But if you just even, you know, just as a reference for gardening, there’s so much in there that I learned from initially.

So if I have to pick a go-to book, that’s it

Speaker 1 (1h 40m 25s): Awesome. That looks like a good one. All right. We’re going to talk about your website in one second, but I’m going to ask my final question and then we’ll tell us how to, can I call to you and how to get to your awesome website, but Barb, if there’s one change you’d like to see, to create a greener world, what would it be? For example, is there a charity organization, your passionate about or project you’d like to see put into action? Like what do you feel is the most crucial issue? Our planet in regards to the environment, either locally, nationally, or on a global scale?

Ooh,

Speaker 2 (1h 41m 1s): Good question. There’s two, I’m extremely passionate about one is water three because there’s just three that I concentrate on regularly where I donate my money towards water, water conservation. We need to readdress the fishing industry. We need to realize that water has the ability to save our planet. If we are using that resource responsibly and we currently are not.

So that’s a huge area of concern. I think soil conservation comes next again, if there’s huge resource that we are overusing and we need to look at ways to replenish the earth before we are out of earth to farm. So those are the two big ones. And then three, I think we all need to step back and remember that we are creatures of the earth. So I think we’re already on that level together, but I don’t think the planet is there.

We all have to get out and connect with the earth, take time, to appreciate nature and, and become understanding that every single thing we do impacts this living creature, this living planet that we are on the earth is a living organism. We are living organisms and we all work in synergy together. And if we are out of synergy with this, which we are currently, as you said, with the green new deal, you support and other things that are striving towards fixing that because we have become disconnected from our earth and our planet.

And this is why we’re having problems that we need to figure out a way to step back refocus. And remember that we are all, we’re all in this together from the smallest little, you know, aunt to the biggest person on the planet, we’re all in this relationship together. And if we don’t preserve each other, well, we’re gonna have some problems, right? And which we’re seeing. So those are my three things that I’m very passionate about and put my time and energy towards and my dollars as well.

Speaker 1 (1h 43m 30s): Oh, Barb, my sister from another mother, my sister from mother earth. I’ll bet other listeners. I know. I feel like I can just reach out and hug you. I’m so glad we did this interview. You were a friend I am destined to meet someday, I know. And just sending you love what an eloquent answer, just so perfect!

Tell listeners about the most awesome rural mom blog. Minimally.

Speaker 2 (1h 43m 59s): I will. And I want to say just as well. I’m so glad that we connected and please do stay in touch cause I love to find people who are just as passionate together, we could do so much. So we need to collaborate on other stuff down the road in our own little, yeah,

Speaker 1 (1h 44m 16s): Maybe we could do a book together. Maybe I can write a children’s book about you!

RuralMom.comBanner


Speaker 2 (1h 44m 30s): My website is ruralmom.com. It’s RURALmom.com. And on there you’ll find me talking about a number of different things. I work in many arenas, but for the most part it’s it’s about gardening things we can do to be more sustainable, you know, gift ideas. A lot of things, my goal with that website was to enhance people’s lives in terms of finding quality things and quality activities that could help people who are living out in the country and suburban areas.

It’s applicable to people living in cities too. I do talk a lot about container gardening and even raising chickens on, you know, balconies kind of things. So I try to adapt to everybody. Who’s kind of out there with me, but for the most part, I’ve found that people who are interested in homesteading, I have a big crowd over 40. I think that’s I’m 50. So that makes sense. I guess I talk on that level. So of where I’m at in life. And I think a lot of us are we’re, we’re kind of done raising children and what’s next.

And how can we now address the bigger picture? So we’ve done our greatest Java’s it’s rural moms. I’m going to address moms here. It’s not that single people don’t do a wonderful job, but as moms we’ve raised our children and we’ve spent our time and energy focusing there and now, you know, how can we use that passion we have for the planet and doing greater good in the world. So there’s a lot of topics out there. I will continue to update for the book. Some of the charts that you mentioned, like the, you know, the shopping list for CBD and things like that.

I will be posting the book launches April 13th, it’s available for pre-order now. But on April 13th, I will have some of those charts principles so that you could like print out or, you know, even just screenshot it and keep it on your phone, whatever works, save the planet, save a tree don’t print, whatever works for you so that you would have those resources available in your hands as you’re shopping as you’re going out in the world, but you don’t have to carry the whole book with you.

It’s a nice size book.

Speaker 1 (1h 46m 56s): If you’re going to take a book to the grocery store, I mean, this will fit in almost any purse it’s like for as much information as is in here. You know, it’s not a large book

Speaker 2 (1h 47m 9s): And that way actually intentionally so that it could be kind of, it’s obviously not a pocket guide because it goes way, way, much further than a pocket guide, but it was this design that it could be easily carried. And that’s also why we put it in paper bags, not hard book cover. So it’s lighter, a little bit more accessible to people. You could bring it out into the garden with you easily.

Speaker 1 (1h 47m 38s): Yeah. It’s it is absolutely fantastic. Well, thank you so much, Barb, and have a wonderful day

Speaker 2 (1h 47m 48s): Again. Please do stay in touch. I love I’m sure we can do something later down the road as your readers as well. Please stay in touch. If you visit ruralmom.com, there are all the links to my social avenues. You can feel free to contact me on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, wherever you hang out. My email address is on there. Feel free to email me. If you have a question like you’re Rosemary, I’ll do what I can. There’s also a section in the book which may help you on growing Rosemary, but I can take it further offline.

So if you’re still struggling, still having problems, just reach out. If I don’t know the answer, I know somebody who does as a researcher. That’s one of the coolest parts of my job. I get to know lots of people. Oh, bless your heart, Mike.

Speaker 1 (1h 48m 39s): Thanks. Bye. All right. I’m showing you.

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